have the last say

have the last say

1. To say the final words in an argument or discussion, especially ones that decisively or conclusively end it. The whole meeting just descended into chaos as everyone tried to have the last say. David is so smug and always has to have the last say in every debate.
2. To have the authority to decide how something ultimately happens or is done. As the editor in chief, I have the last say on the layout design for every issue.
See also: have, last, say
References in classic literature ?
For I know that all pretty young gentlemen like to have pretty similes made about them--as well they may--but I shall not return the compliment.
I know that it touched me to think of such a life so spent, and that I came to myself and implored him to give it all.
Why, o' course I know THAT,' said Riderhood, as arguing something that was self-evident.
I am, therefore, in a measure constrained to follow that road, and by it I must travel in spite of all the world, and it will be labour in vain for you to urge me to resist what heaven wills, fate ordains, reason requires, and, above all, my own inclination favours; for knowing as I do the countless toils that are the accompaniments of knight-errantry, I know, too, the infinite blessings that are attained by it; I know that the path of virtue is very narrow, and the road of vice broad and spacious; I know their ends and goals are different, for the broad and easy road of vice ends in death, and the narrow and toilsome one of virtue in life, and not transitory life, but in that which has no end; I know, as our great Castilian poet says, that-
My poor Charles, who had the finest, most generous spirit in the world, would have divided his last farthing with him; and I know that his purse was open to him; I know that he often assisted him.
I remember the time when he came to me and cried, talking of you, and all the poetry and loftiness of his feeling for you, and I know that the longer he has lived with you the loftier you have been in his eyes.
Now I am going to tell you all I can about them, because I know that is what you most want to hear.
I will not say, 'Do not be uneasy,' because I know that you are so, at this moment; but be as little uneasy as you can.
Oh, Madam Mina, I know that the friend of that poor little girl must be good, but I had yet to learn.