have the final say

have the final say

1. To say the final words in an argument or discussion, especially ones that decisively or conclusively end it. The whole meeting just descended into chaos as everyone tried to have the final say. David is so smug and always has to have the final say in every debate.
2. To have the authority to decide how something ultimately happens or is done. As the editor in chief, I have the final say on the layout design for every issue.
See also: final, have, say
References in periodicals archive ?
Phil Davies - leader of Wirral council and chair of the Combined Authority for the Liverpool city region which will have the final say on the increase - said it had a "disproportionate" effect on people in Wirral.
Since April, the tunnels have become assets of the newly-created Liverpool City Region Combined Authority - which will have the final say on tolls - although the tunnels are still operated on a day-to-day basis by Merseytravel.
It came down to the fact he brought Kevin Keegan back to Newcastle and then undermined him, the wrong people had too much power and Keegan didn't have the final say on who was signed and sold.
Just one in seven thinks that parishioners should have the final say over all aspects of parish finances, but only 3 percent say that parishioners should have no role--all parish financial decisions should be made independently by the priest (See figure 2).
Regardless of their level of commitment to the church, just under two-thirds say that parishioners should have input in determining the budget and one in seven say that parishioners should have the final say.
Older Catholics, those who have a memory of the church before Vatican II, are more likely than younger, post-Vatican II Catholics to feel that parishioners should have the final say over all aspects of parish finances.
3) He would like the bishops of a country to have the final say concerning the translations of the liturgy which are used in their churches.
On point five, Monsignor Murphy says that, whatever the theoretical case may be, a bishop should have the final say in his diocese concerning whether married men may be ordained.