hatchet

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give pap with a hatchet

To act or seem as though one is doing something with good or kind intentions when, really, the opposite is true. To "give pap" means for a mother to comfort an infant with her nipple—an intentional juxtaposition with the sharp and dangerous "hatchet." I thought Lauren wanted to be my friend, but then I found out she only invited me to sit at her table to make fun of me. Talk about giving pap with a hatchet!
See also: give, hatchet

hang up (one's) hatchet

1. To make peace with someone. It is most likely an earlier version of the phrase "bury the hatchet." Can you please hang up your hatchet and make up with your sister already? I can't take the constant fighting.
2. To take a break from work; to stop working. Hang up your hatchet, buddy, it's lunchtime! It's really time for me to hang up my hatchet and find a new job somewhere else.
See also: hang, hatchet, up

hatchet job

A very critical attack on someone or something, especially through media outlets. The movie critic did a real hatchet job on the new film in last week's paper.
See also: hatchet, job

hatchet man

A person hired by a company to make sweeping changes to save money, usually by reducing staff. We knew our days were numbered when our company brought in a hatchet man to make cuts to the staff.
See also: hatchet, man

send the helve after the hatchet

To make hasty, careless decisions; to discard something after encountering a setback. The image alludes to throwing away the handle ("helve") of a hatchet after the blade has broken off. Come on, I'm sure we can fix it—don't send the helve after the hatchet. My little brother always gives up at the slightest problem, no matter how many times we remind him not to send the helve after the hatchet.
See also: after, hatchet, send

take up the hatchet

To fight, especially in a violent manner. The feud has lasted for so long that neither family remembers why they took up the hatchet against the other.
See also: hatchet, take, up

bury the hatchet

Fig. to make peace. Let's stop arguing and bury the hatchet. Tom and I buried the hatchet and we are good friends now.
See also: bury, hatchet

hatchet man

a man who does the cruel or difficult things for someone else; someone who does someone else's dirty work. He served as the president's hatchet man and ended up doing all the dirty work.
See also: hatchet, man

bury the hatchet

to agree that you will forget about arguments and disagreements with someone The two teammates hope to bury the hatchet long enough to win the championship.
Etymology: based on the custom of literally burying a hatchet (cutting tool with a small handle) as a symbol of peace between Native American tribes (groups of people)
See also: bury, hatchet

bury the hatchet

to forget about arguments and disagreements with someone and to become friends with them again It had been over a year since the incident and I thought it was time we buried the hatchet.
See also: bury, hatchet

a hatchet job

  (informal)
strong and unfair criticism of someone or something, especially on television or in a newspaper She did a real hatchet job on his latest novel in one of the Sunday papers.
See also: hatchet, job

a hatchet man

  (informal)
someone who is employed by an organization to make changes that people do not like The hatchet man is called in whenever a company needs to reduce its staff.
See bury the hatchet
See also: hatchet, man

bury the hatchet

Make peace; settle one's differences. For example, Toward the end of the year, the roommates finally decided to bury the hatchet. Although some believe this term comes from a Native American custom for declaring peace between warring tribes, others say it comes from hang up one's hatchet, a term dating from the early 1300s (well before Columbus landed in the New World). The word bury replaced hang up in the 1700s.
See also: bury, hatchet

hatchet man

1. A person assigned or hired to carry out a disagreeable task or unscrupulous order. For example, When it came to firing an employee, Arthur was his boss's hatchet man. This expression originally referred to a hired assassin but in the mid-1900s was transferred to less nefarious enterprises.
2. A person who attacks the reputation of others, especially a journalist hired to do so, as in You can count on Mary's column to destroy the mayor-she's the perfect hatchet man. This usage gave rise to hatchet job, meaning "harsh destructive criticism." [Mid-1900s]
See also: hatchet, man

bury the hatchet

1. tv. to make peace. (From an alleged American Indian practice.) I’m sorry. Let’s stop arguing and bury the hatchet.
2. tv. to leave surgical instruments in the patient. (Medical.) The idea that a doctor would bury the hatchet is a very old joke.
See also: bury, hatchet

bury the hatchet

To stop fighting; resolve a quarrel.
See also: bury, hatchet

bury the hatchet

To make peace, to settle differences. The phrase comes from the practice among native American and Canadian tribes literally to bury a war axe at the end of hostilities. An 1680 report describes European colonists in what became New England: “Meeting wth ye Sachem [the tribal leaders] the[y] came to an agreemt and buried two Axes in ye Ground; which ceremony to them is more significant & binding than all Articles of Peace . . .”
See also: bury, hatchet
References in periodicals archive ?
BENEATH EATHEA the heady peacepipe smoke hovering over the Ricoh, there are still a few unburied hatchets to be seen lying on the pitch.
In his hand was a card for the Athol 250th anniversary hatchet, one of four hatchets given away this year at the event, run by the Athol YCMA and Fire Department.
Pete Carol of ProAdventure said: "We got involved with Gransfors Bruk following our introduction of bushcrafting courses a couple of years ago, when we started importing the company's hatchets.
Jimmy Lackenby, of Gateshead, steps in with this one: "Burying the hatchet originates from the American Indian tradition of burying the hatchets of the chiefs of tribes when they came to a peace agreement.
A 62-year-old man was taken to hospital with serious head and back injuries after the attacker - armed with two small axes or hatchets - went on the rampage in Waltham Cross, Hertfordshire.
Yes, there the hatchets were, whacked into the wood with a vigor that told you then, and tells you more emphatically now, that Dine was never suited (or bathrobed) for classification in the, to my mind, relatively benign Pop-art category.
Over the years, MTA drivers have suffered attacks by passengers and others who brandished broomsticks, wheelchair parts, skateboards, beer bottles, metal pipes, surgical scalpels, hatchets, corkscrews and other items.
The prosecution alleged that this implement -- one of a number of axes and hatchets found in the Bordens' cellar -- was the murder weapon, although, he said, they knew they could not prove this directly.
CUTLINE: (1) Jacob Lacasse, 11, digs for cards representing the Johnnie Johnstone and the George Washington hatchets during the 88th Hatchet Hunt in the woods behind Athol-Royalston Middle School yesterday.
As the Daily News reported June 2, drivers have been pummeled with broomsticks, skateboards, beer bottles and hatchets, and have had caustic chemicals, tear gas and urine sprayed on them.
As the Daily News reported June 2, drivers have been pummeled by broomsticks, skateboards, beer bottles and hatchets, and have had caustic chemicals, tear gas and urine sprayed on them.
The cards are turned in for one of the 53 major prizes, including the hatchets.
The hatchets are affixed to plaques the winners can, if they wish, hang on a wall at home.
This year there are more than $2,000 worth of prizes, plus the Johnnie Johnstone and George Washington memorial hatchets to give out.
This year tickets for 55 prizes were hidden in the woods, including tickets for the Johnny Johnstone and George Washington memorial hatchets.