hatch

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Related to hatches: batten down the hatches

don't count your chickens before they're hatched

Don't make plans based on future events that might not happen. When my mom heard that I was preparing my campaign before even being nominated, she warned me, "Don't count your chickens before they're hatched." Why are you begging to drive my car to school tomorrow when you still need to take your license test in the morning? Don't count your chickens before they're hatched, babe!
See also: before, chicken, count, hatch

batten down the hatches

To prepare for a challenging situation. While this originated as a nautical phrase, it is now used for any sort of imminent problem. There's a tornado coming—batten down the hatches! My mother-in-law is coming to town this weekend, so I better batten down the hatches.
See also: down, hatch

count your chickens before they hatch

To celebrate, plan, or begin to take advantage of a potential positive future outcome before it has happened or been accomplished. Often issued as a warning and preceded by "don't." You're preparing your acceptance speech before even being nominated? Don't count your chickens before they hatch. Why are you begging to drive my car to school tomorrow when you still need to take your license test? Don't count your chickens before they hatch, babe!
See also: before, chicken, count, hatch

count your chickens before they're hatched

To celebrate, plan, or begin to take advantage of a potential positive future outcome before it has happened or been accomplished. Often issued as a warning and preceded by "don't." You're preparing your acceptance speech before even being nominated? Don't count your chickens before they're hatched. Why are you begging to drive my car to school tomorrow when you still need to take your license test? Don't count your chickens before they're hatched, babe!
See also: before, chicken, count, hatch

down the hatch

Down one's throat. This phrase is usually said before one drinks something (often something that has an especially foul or strong taste). "Well, down the hatch!" Ellen said before taking her cough medicine.
See also: down, hatch

batten down the hatches

Fig. to prepare for difficult times. (From a nautical expression meaning, literally, to seal the hatches against the arrival of a storm. The word order is fixed.) Here comes that contentious Mrs. Jones. Batten down the hatches! Batten down the hatches, Congress is in session again.
See also: down, hatch

count one's chickens before they hatch

Fig. to plan how to utilize good results of something before those results have occurred. (The same as Don't count your chickens before they are hatched.) You may be disappointed if you count your chickens before they hatch.
See also: before, chicken, count, hatch

Down the hatch.

I am about to drink this.; Let's all drink up. (Said as one is about to take a drink, especially of something bad-tasting or potent. Also used as a jocular toast.) Bob said, "Down the hatch," and drank the whiskey in one gulp. Let's toast the bride and groom. Down the hatch!
See also: down, hatch

hatch an animal out

to aid in releasing an animal from an egg. They hatched lots of ducks out at the hatchery. The farmer hatched out hundreds of chicks each month.
See also: animal, hatch, out

batten down the hatches

Prepare for trouble, as in Here comes the boss-batten down the hatches. This term originated in the navy, where it signified preparing for a storm by fastening down canvas over doorways and hatches (openings) with strips of wood called battens. [Late 1800s]
See also: down, hatch

count one's chickens before they hatch

Make plans based on events that may or may not happen. For example, You might not win the prize and you've already spent the money? Don't count your chickens before they hatch! or I know you have big plans for your consulting business, but don't count your chickens. This expression comes from Aesop's fable about a milkmaid carrying a full pail on her head. She daydreams about buying chickens with the milk's proceeds and becoming so rich from selling eggs that she will toss her head at suitors; she then tosses her head and spills the milk. Widely translated from the original Greek, the story was the source of a proverb and was used figuratively by the 16th century. Today it is still so well known that it often appears shortened and usually in negative cautionary form ( don't count your chickens).
See also: before, chicken, count, hatch

down the hatch

Drink up, as in " Down the hatch," said Bill, as they raised their glasses. This phrase, often used as a toast, employs hatch in the sense of "a trap door found on ships." [Slang; c. 1930]
See also: down, hatch

not count your chickens

or

not count your chickens before they are hatched

If you say that you are not counting your chickens (before they are hatched), you mean that you are not making plans for the future yet because you do not know for certain how a particular situation will develop. If we get through to the next stage, we'll be competing against some top-class sides so I'm not counting my chickens. When dealing with important financial arrangements, never count your chickens before they are hatched. Note: You can also use the proverb don't count your chickens before they're hatched from which this expression comes. The contract is not signed yet. Don't count your chickens before they're hatched.
See also: chicken, count, not

down the hatch

INFORMAL
If food or drink goes down the hatch, someone eats or drinks it. A record £4.4 billion worth of chocolate and sweets went down the hatch last year. She raised the shell to her lips, closed her eyes and down the hatch went the oyster. Note: People sometimes say down the hatch! just before drinking an alcoholic drink. Here's a glass for you. Down the hatch! Note: In the 18th century, this expression was used as a toast in the navy. A hatch is an opening in the deck of a ship, through which people and goods can pass.
See also: down, hatch

batten down the hatches

If you batten down the hatches, you prepare for a difficult situation by doing everything you can to protect yourself. While most companies are battening down the hatches, fearing recession, Blenheim is leading an assault on the US market. Banks seem to be battening down the hatches in anticipation of further trouble. Note: Battens are strips of wood used for fastening things down. Hatches are openings in the deck of a ship, or the wooden flaps which cover the openings.
See also: down, hatch

batten down the hatches

prepare for a difficulty or crisis.
Batten down the hatches was originally a nautical term meaning ‘make a ship's hatches secure with gratings and tarpaulins’ in expectation of stormy weather.
1998 Oldie They endured the hard pounding of the Seventies, when Labour battened down the hatches, and soldiered through the follies of the early Eighties.
See also: down, hatch

down the hatch

used to express friendly feelings towards your companions before drinking. informal
See also: down, hatch

hatches, matches, and despatches

the births, marriages, and deaths columns in a newspaper. humorous, dated
See also: and

under (the) hatches

1 below deck in a ship. 2 concealed from public knowledge.
See also: hatch

ˌbatten down the ˈhatches

prepare yourself for a period of difficulty or trouble: Hollywood is battening down the hatches in expectation of a strike by actors and writers this summer.A batten is a long piece of wood which was used to hold down strong material in order to cover a ship’s hatches (= openings in the deck of a boat leading to the lower level) in a storm.
See also: down, hatch

not count your ˈchickens (before they’re ˈhatched)

not be too confident of success until it actually happens: She said she was certain to be offered a part in the play, but I told her not to count her chickens, as a lot of other people wanted the same part.
See also: chicken, count, not

ˌdown the ˈhatch

(informal) said before you drink alcohol: He raised his glass, said ‘Down the hatch’, and then drank it all at once!This is thought to come from ships, where goods go down through the hatch (= an opening in the floor) to be stored for the journey, as if they are being swallowed.
See also: down, hatch

booby hatch

(ˈbubi...)
n. a mental hospital. I was afraid they would send me to the booby hatch.
See also: booby, hatch

Down the hatch!

exclam. Let’s drink it! (see also hatch.) Down the hatch! Have another?
See also: down

hatch

n. the mouth. (see also Down the hatch!.) Pop this in your hatch.

down the hatch

Slang
Drink up. Often used as a toast.
See also: down, hatch

batten down the hatches

To prepare for an imminent disaster or emergency.
See also: down, hatch
References in periodicals archive ?
Your tank is considered not mission capable if the hatches or hatch locks don't work.
Although these escape hatches are numerous, they're extremely narrow, making it difficult to explain how so many asteroid fragments end up pelting the inner planets.
Early last year, two researchers suggested that a subtle nongravitational effect, which is so tiny it had often been overlooked, helps usher toward these zones asteroids that originate far from the escape hatches.
That's enough to push asteroids with diameters of less than 20 km into one of the escape hatches.
Hatches are sealed promptly to limit the risk of contamination.
Open railcar hatches and outlets are a major cause of water, dirt and insect contamination.
There are other hatches going on (duns, sedges and midges), but the rainbows eat one stonefly and their brains key in on that one particular thing and it becomes their food of choice,'' said Tom Scott, a Portland fly-fisherman I've known since junior high who was taking me down the 36-mile stretch of the Deschutes from Trout Creek to Maupin for the fifth time in a McKenzie-style drift boat (named after another Oregon river) he built from scratch in 1980.
If that happens, the cable moves around and can get caught in either of the two hatches.
If you don't, the hatches aren't locked shut and they will leak.
A good BEFORE PMCS check is to eyeball the hatches for anything that could prevent a good seal.