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don't count your chickens before they're hatched

Don't make plans based on future events that might not happen. When my mom heard that I was preparing my campaign before even being nominated, she warned me, "Don't count your chickens before they're hatched." Why are you begging to drive my car to school tomorrow when you still need to take your license test in the morning? Don't count your chickens before they're hatched, babe!
See also: before, chicken, count, hatch

batten down the hatches

Fig. to prepare for difficult times. (From a nautical expression meaning, literally, to seal the hatches against the arrival of a storm. The word order is fixed.) Here comes that contentious Mrs. Jones. Batten down the hatches! Batten down the hatches, Congress is in session again.
See also: down, hatch

count one's chickens before they hatch

Fig. to plan how to utilize good results of something before those results have occurred. (The same as Don't count your chickens before they are hatched.) You may be disappointed if you count your chickens before they hatch.
See also: before, chicken, count, hatch

Down the hatch.

I am about to drink this.; Let's all drink up. (Said as one is about to take a drink, especially of something bad-tasting or potent. Also used as a jocular toast.) Bob said, "Down the hatch," and drank the whiskey in one gulp. Let's toast the bride and groom. Down the hatch!
See also: down, hatch

hatch an animal out

to aid in releasing an animal from an egg. They hatched lots of ducks out at the hatchery. The farmer hatched out hundreds of chicks each month.
See also: animal, hatch, out

batten down the hatches

to prepare yourself for a difficult period by protecting yourself in every possible way
Usage notes: When there is a storm, ships batten down the hatches (= close the doors to the outside) as protection against bad weather.
When you're coming down with a cold, all you can do is batten down the hatches and wait for the body to fight it off.
See also: down, hatch

Down the hatch!

  (informal)
something that you say before drinking an alcoholic drink, especially when you are going to drink it all without stopping And a whisky for you. Down the hatch, as they say.
See also: down

batten down the hatches

Prepare for trouble, as in Here comes the boss-batten down the hatches. This term originated in the navy, where it signified preparing for a storm by fastening down canvas over doorways and hatches (openings) with strips of wood called battens. [Late 1800s]
See also: down, hatch

count one's chickens before they hatch

Make plans based on events that may or may not happen. For example, You might not win the prize and you've already spent the money? Don't count your chickens before they hatch! or I know you have big plans for your consulting business, but don't count your chickens. This expression comes from Aesop's fable about a milkmaid carrying a full pail on her head. She daydreams about buying chickens with the milk's proceeds and becoming so rich from selling eggs that she will toss her head at suitors; she then tosses her head and spills the milk. Widely translated from the original Greek, the story was the source of a proverb and was used figuratively by the 16th century. Today it is still so well known that it often appears shortened and usually in negative cautionary form ( don't count your chickens).
See also: before, chicken, count, hatch

down the hatch

Drink up, as in " Down the hatch," said Bill, as they raised their glasses. This phrase, often used as a toast, employs hatch in the sense of "a trap door found on ships." [Slang; c. 1930]
See also: down, hatch

booby hatch

(ˈbubi...)
n. a mental hospital. I was afraid they would send me to the booby hatch.
See also: booby, hatch

Down the hatch!

exclam. Let’s drink it! (see also hatch.) Down the hatch! Have another?
See also: down

hatch

n. the mouth. (see also Down the hatch!.) Pop this in your hatch.

down the hatch

Slang
Drink up. Often used as a toast.
See also: down, hatch

batten down the hatches

To prepare for an imminent disaster or emergency.
See also: down, hatch
References in periodicals archive ?
We felt this was important because IT professionals' main focus is helping organizations achieve their goals," said Hatcher.
In addition to these obstacles, Hatcher had become aware of a more serious situation that could undermine the fundamental concept of Rain Dance.
L/Cpl Brunning was presented with his medal by Captain Rhett Hatcher, HMS Protector's Commanding Officer.
Pastor Theresa Hatcher Xulon Press, 866-381-2665, www.
Hatcher is a graduate of Princeton University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in East Asian religious studies and a double minor in theatre and dance.
Desperate Housewives" star Teri Hatcher has talked about the details of her childhood sexual abuse by her uncle when she was just seven years old.
Hatcher started his career with Marcus & Millichap in May 2006 as an associate, and was promoted to senior associate in July 2009.
Whispers heard that too, hut Hatcher says that's not exactly right.
Music was provided by violinist Joy Carino, guitarists Aaron Sibley and Josh Gosa, and vocalists Kayla Hatcher, Olivia Gosa, Josh Gosa and Aaron Sibley.
The following evening both Mr Reid and Mr Hatcher are seen leaving the flat.
Barry Hatcher, 46, attacked Nathan Reid in his own flat, headbutting him and kicked him unconscious, the prosecution said.
Specifically, what does a pro such as Hatcher look for in a stock?
Previous choreography winners include the Joffrey Ballet's Daniel Baudendistel and Ben Hatcher of Les Grands Ballets Canadiens and Fondation Jean-Pierre Perreault.
Rather than perpetuating a tendency to view nineteenth-century Bengali reformminded intellectuals as hybrids of tradition and modernity and of Indian and Western ideas, Hatcher considers Vidyasagar as a triveni, a confluent of three streams of thought: Sanskritic culture, Western ideas, and "the cultural ethos and vernacular discourse of colonial Bengal" (p.
One group helping the public understand how everything is linked is the nonprofit Georgia Conservancy, led by its dynamic president and CEO Carolyn Boyd Hatcher.