harness


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Related to harness: harness racing

die in harness

To die while still actively working or still of the age or physical condition to do so (i.e., before retirement). With medicine and healthcare improving at such vast rates, far fewer people die in harness than ever before.
See also: die, harness

back in(to) (the) harness

Resuming one's daily work. I'm not thrilled to get back into the harness on Monday. When do you get back in harness after your trip?
See also: back, harness

be back in harness

To resume one's daily work. Primarily heard in UK. I'm not thrilled to be back in harness on Monday. When are you back in harness after your trip?
See also: back, harness

in harness

Doing one's usual job; at work. I know you're not thrilled to be in harness on this Monday, gentlemen, but please try to focus. When are you back in harness after your trip?
See also: harness

*back in(to) (the) harness

Fig. back doing one's job. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) I don't look forward to getting back into the harness next Monday. When my vacation is over, I have to get back into harness the very next day. I'm not looking forward to having to get back in harness after my trip abroad.
See also: back, harness

harness an animal up

to put a harness on an animal, such as a horse. You had better harness the horses up so we can go. Please harness up the mare for me.
See also: animal, harness, up

harness someone (or an animal) to something

to attach someone, something, or an animal to something with a harness. The instructor harnessed me to the hang glider, and I really began to get nervous. Andrew harnessed the horses to the little wagon.
See also: harness

die with one's boots on

Also, die in harness. Expire while working, keep working to the end, as in He'll never retire-he'll die with his boots on, or She knows she'll never get promoted, but she wants to die in harness. Both phrases probably allude to soldiers who died on active duty. Until the early 1600s the noun boot denoted a piece of armor for the legs, which may have given rise to this usage; and Shakespeare used harness in the sense of armor when he wrote: "At least we'll die with harness on our back" ( Macbeth 5:5).
See also: boot, die, on

in harness

On duty or at work. For example, Despite his illness he's determined to continue in harness. It also is put as be back in harness, meaning "to return to duty or work," as in After a long vacation she's finally back in harness. This expression alludes to horses harnessed to perform work. [First half of 1800s] Also see die with one's boots on (in harness).
See also: harness

in harness

mainly BRITISH
1. If someone is in harness, they are actively doing their job. Note: A harness is a set of straps like the one that is fitted to a horse when it pulls a cart. Random jumped at the chance to be back in harness. Other workers may die in harness, in which case their beneficiaries receive the money.
2. If two or more people or things work in harness, they work together or produce something together. Note: A harness is a set of straps like the one that is fitted to a horse when it pulls a cart. Experts in statistics and computing may work in harness on a single project. What is fundamental to creativity is for the two hemispheres of the brain to be working in harness.
See also: harness

die in harness

die before retirement.
This expression is drawing a comparison between a person at work and a horse in harness drawing a plough or cart.
1992 Harper's Magazine Don't overly concern yourself with the union pension fund. Musicians mostly die in harness.
See also: die, harness

in harness

1 in the routine of daily work. 2 working closely with someone to achieve something.
The image is of a horse or other animal being used for driving or draught work.
See also: harness

die in ˈharness

die while you are still working
See also: die, harness

in ˈharness

(British English) doing your normal work, especially after a rest or a holiday/vacation: After so many weeks away, it felt good to be back in harness again.
A harness is a set of strips of leather and metal pieces that is used for controlling a horse.
See also: harness

in ˈharness (with somebody)

(British English) working closely with somebody in order to achieve something: The manager told us to remember that we’re a team, and that we can achieve much greater results if we’re working in harness.
See also: harness

in harness

On duty or at work.
See also: harness
References in periodicals archive ?
By application, the global automotive wiring harness market is segmented into chassis, heat, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), and sensors.
The harness itself was of an uncomplicated construction.
Wales is proud to host two of the biggest and best meetings in the British Harness Racing Club calendar - the Ceredigion Trotting Club weekend at the start of July and the Tregaron Trotting Club festival on August bank holiday.
Capital Harness TVM addresses a critical business dynamic for wire harness suppliers: how to respond rapidly to requests for quotation.
THAT UNSECURED HARNESS GETS TANGLED WITH THE HMMWVS TRANSMISSION, TRANSFER AND PARKING BRAKE CONTROL LEVERS.
With the rapid development of global automobile industry, the automotive wiring harness processing industry also gained significant progress.
Unfortunately, most hunters never consider what to do if they fall from a treestand and are dangling 15 feet in the air by their full-body safety harness," said Pat Lefemine, founder of the Bowsite.
Gross and fine motor skills are necessary for an individual to hold on to a harness and walk with a dog.
I would recommend against buying a harness system that does not include a lineman's belt option.
Another problem is that the plastic harness clip (on most car seats) is not at armpit level.
THE harness racing community is profoundly grateful to Edward Gillespie, at Cheltenham, for allowing us to showcase the sport before the hunter chase meeting on May 3' to Mel Davies for sponsoring' and to the Racing Post for covering it so attractively.
Briefly, the sequence includes positioning the assembly, reading a bar code to identify the specific harness, sending the information to the PLC and informing the camera system of the harness configuration, and running the inspection procedure.
VERY big in the USA and even dubbed ``Wales's national sport'' by one leading aficionado, harness racing or trotting has a massive following yet often a low profile.
THE HARNESS TRACKS OF AMERICA SCHOLARSHIP Amount: $5,000 (average).
The harness wraps around the rescuer's torso and under the legs and the hoist line connects near the waist, leaving the upper body free.