hark

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Related to harking: harking back

hark(en) back to something

 
1. to have originated as something; to have started out as something. (Harken is an older word meaning "pay heed to.") The word icebox harks back to refrigerators that were cooled by ice. Our modern breakfast cereals hark back to the porridge and gruel of our ancestors.
2. to remind one of something. Seeing a horse and buggy in the park harks back to the time when horses drew milk wagons. Sally says it harkens back to the time when everything was delivered by horse-drawn wagons.
See also: back, hark

hark back to something

to be similar to something from the past His music harks back to Elvis Presley and other 1950s influences.
See also: back, hark

hark back

Return to a previous point, as in Let us hark back briefly to my first statement. This expression originally alluded to hounds retracing their course when they have lost their quarry's scent. It may be dying out. [First half of 1800s]
See also: back, hark
References in periodicals archive ?
Harking back to the earlier era's effort to dismantle the artwork's autonomy by refracting it across multiple registers, Gordon's project is a filmic re-presentation of a live action.
While harking back to classical epic, chanson de geste, and medieval romance and looking forward to the modern novel, Murrin concentrates on heroic poetry of the sixteenth century, which he seeks to read in light of both the dramatic changes in the conduct of warfare during that epoch and the historical records that pertain to the conflicts such poetry aims to represent.
The name "New Wave" is itself retro, harking back to the nouvelle vague of '60s French cinema.
Harking back to elaborate tree forts hosting gangs of neighborhood kids, "Mirz," a group project organized by artists Ward Shelley, Peter Soriano, and Jesse Bercowetz, brought together dozens of collaborators to build a complex of seven modules suspended from the ceiling of this Brooklyn gallery's two-story main space.
Diana Thater has spent her career harking the call of the wild, videotaping exotic animals like wolves, zebras, and Andalusian stallions.
The former hung low, literally at one's side, with the barest horizon line and an allover riot of "scribblings," precision-cut from black felt, suggesting a landscape (a forest or swamp) or, harking back to Abstract Expressionism, orchestrated chaos.