hare


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Related to hare: Hare Krishna

hold with the hare and run with the hounds

1. To support or attempt to placate both sides of a conflict or dispute. Many have criticized the US government of holding with the hare and running with the hound regarding the territorial dispute between the two nations.
2. To act duplicitously or hypocritically; to speak or act out against something while engaging or taking part in it. How can you be taken seriously as an anti-drug reformer when extensive documents reveal that you are a frequent user of methamphetamine? You can't hold with the hare and run with the hound, Senator.
See also: and, hare, hold, hound, run

you can't run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

When two parties are in conflict, you can't support both of them—you must choose one. Come on, you can't run with the hare and hunt with the hounds—pick a side! You're either in favor of renovating the library, or you're not.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run

be as mad as a March hare

To be crazy. The phrase alludes to hares' erratic behavior during their breeding season. Mom was as mad as a March hare after I dented her brand-new car.
See also: hare, mad, march

run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

1. To support or attempt to placate both sides of a conflict or dispute. Many have criticized the government of running with the hare and hunting with the hounds regarding the territorial dispute between the two nations.
2. To act duplicitously or hypocritically; to speak or act out against something while engaging or taking part in it. How can you be taken seriously as a reformer when you have continued to accept gifts? You can't run with the hare and hunt with the hounds, Senator.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run

start a hare (running)

To raise, introduce, or prompt discussion about a certain topic. The MP was quick to state that he didn't want to start a hare running about the controversial issue ahead of the snap election. He started a hare that got the whole country talking about the implications of the new tax on working-class citizens.
See also: hare, start

(as) mad as a March hare

1. Crazy or deranged; particularly eccentric. My grandfather came back from the war as mad as a March hare because of all the horrible things he saw. I'll be mad as a March hare if I have to deal with these screaming toddlers for much longer. My family thinks I'm as mad as a March hare just because I practice a form of alternative medicine using magnetic fields.
2. Particularly cross or angry. Mom was mad as a March hare after I dented her brand-new car. John gets as mad as a March hare when he starts losing.
See also: hare, mad, march

run with

1. To run while in the company of someone else. I go running with my friend Jake every morning before school.
2. To have a particular trait or characteristic when one runs. I've always run with awkward, plodding steps, so I don't think I'd do well in a sport that requires such fancy footwork. I've never seen anyone run with such grace or dexterity before.
3. To keep company or socialize with someone. Jason's been running with troublesome group of kids lately. I thought you ran with a different gang—did you have a falling out with them?
4. To accept or adopt something and begin carrying it out with great enthusiasm. The boss decided to run with my idea of developing a smartphone app to accompany our newest product. That's a really clever topic—you should run with it for your thesis.
See also: run

First catch your hare.

Prov. Do not make plans about what you will do when you have something until you actually have it. Fred: When I buy my house on the beach, you can spend summers with me there. Ellen: First catch your hare.
See also: catch, first, hare

If you run after two hares, you will catch neither.

Prov. You cannot do two things successfully at the same time. Vanessa: If I want to pursue my acting career, I'll have to take more days off to go to auditions. But I want to get ahead in the office, too. Jane: If you run after two hares, you will catch neither.
See also: after, catch, if, neither, run, two, will

*mad as a hatter

 and *mad as a march hare 
1. crazy. (Alludes to the crazy characters in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. *Also: as ~.) Poor old John is as mad as a hatter. All these screaming children are driving me mad as a hatter.
2. angry. (This is a misunderstanding of mad in the first sense. *Also: as ~.) You make me so angry! I'm as mad as a hatter. John can't control his temper. He's always mad as a hatter.
See also: hatter, mad

run with someone or something

to stay in the company of someone or some group. Fred was out running with Larry when they met Vernon. Let's go out and run with the other guys this morning.
See also: run

run with something

 
1. Lit. to run, showing a particular characteristic. Sally runs with speed and grace. Fred runs with tremendous speed.
2. Fig. to take over something and handle it aggressively and independently. I know that Alice can handle the job. She will take it on and run with it. I hope she runs with this next project.
See also: run

run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

Fig. to support both sides of a dispute. In our office politics, Sally always tries to run with the hare and hunt with the hounds, telling both the clerical workers and the management that she thinks they should prevail.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run

mad as a hatter

Also, mad as a March hare. Crazy, demented, as in She is throwing out all his clothes; she's mad as a hatter. This expression, dating from the early 1800s, alludes to exposure to the chemicals formerly used in making felt hats, which caused tremors and other nervous symptoms. The variant, dating from the 14th century, alludes to the crazy behavior of hares during rutting season, mistakenly thought to be only in March.
See also: hatter, mad

run with

1. Also, run around with. Socialize with; see run around, def. 2.
2. Take as one's own, adopt; also, carry out enthusiastically. For example, He wanted to run with the idea and go public immediately.
3. run with the hare, hunt with the hounds. Support two opposing sides at the same time, as in He wants to increase the magazine's circulation along with its price-that's trying to run with the hare and hunt with the hounds . This expression, alluding to being both hunter and hunted at the same time, dates from the 1400s and was already a proverb in John Heywood's 1546 collection.
See also: run

run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

BRITISH, LITERARY
If someone runs with the hare and hunts with the hounds, they try to support both sides in an argument or fight. They want to keep the peace and have everybody happy. For this reason they learn very quickly to run with the hares and hunt with the hounds. Note: A hound is a dog that has been bred for hunting.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run

start a hare

BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
If you start a hare, you introduce a new idea or topic which other people become interested in. Some work needs to be done before the connection between aluminium and heart disease is proved, but Mr Birchall has started a hare that many researchers will be watching. Note: To `start' a hare means to disturb it and cause it to leave its hiding place, so that the hounds start chasing it.
See also: hare, start

mad as a hatter

mainly BRITISH
If someone is as mad as a hatter, they are crazy. Her sister's as mad as a hatter and if you ask me she's not much better herself. Note: In the 19th century, `hatters' or hat-makers used nitrate of mercury to treat their fabrics. This substance is poisonous, and if the hat-makers breathed it in, they often suffered brain damage. As a result, hatters were traditionally thought of as mad. In Lewis Carroll's children's story `Alice in Wonderland' (1865), one of the characters is a hatter who behaves very strangely. Carroll may have based the character on a well-known Oxford furniture dealer, Theophilus Carter, who was known as the `Mad Hatter'.
See also: hatter, mad

run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

try to remain on good terms with both sides in a conflict or dispute. British
This expression has been in use since the mid 15th century.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run

start a hare

raise a topic of conversation. British , dated
The rapid twisting and running of a hunted hare is here used as a metaphor for the pursuit of a topic in an animated conversation, especially one in which the participants hold strong views.
See also: hare, start

mad as a hatter (or a March hare)

completely crazy. informal
In this expression, a hatter refers to Lewis Carroll's character, the Mad Hatter, in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland ( 1865 ). It is thought that hatters suffered from the effects of mercury poisoning because of the fumes arising from the use of mercurous nitrate in the manufacture of felt hats. The March hare version refers to the way hares leap about during the breeding season.
See also: hatter, mad

run with the ˌhare and hunt with the ˈhounds

try to remain friendly with both sides in a quarrel: I know you want to keep everyone happy, but I’m afraid you can’t run with the hare and hunt with the hounds on this issue.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run

(as) mad as a ˈhatter

(informal) (of a person) crazyThe Mad Hatter was a character in Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Because of the chemicals used in hat-making, workers often suffered from mercury poisoning, which can cause loss of memory and damage to the nervous system.
See also: hatter, mad

(as) mad as a March ˈhare

(informal) (of a person) crazyA March hare refers to a hare (= an animal like a large rabbit) that behaves very strangely in the breeding season.
See also: hare, mad, march

run with

v.
1. To accompany and participate in the activities of someone or something: Those teenagers run with a wild crowd.
2. To float or sail in the same direction as something:The sailboat ran with the wind all the way to the beach. On the trip back, we can run with the current, and we won't have to paddle the canoe.
3. To adopt something or take something as one's own and then proceed with it: I took their idea for a novel and ran with it.
See also: run

mad as a hatter

Crazy. The standard explanation comes from the effect to the brain caused by mercury nitrate used by 18th- and 19th-century hatmakers. Another view holds that “mad” originally meant “poisonous” and “hatter” is a corruption of the Saxon word “atter,” the adder snake, the bite of which affects the brain. In any event, the Mad Hatter character in Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland is a testimony to eccentricity bordering on madness.
See also: hatter, mad

mad as a March hare

Crazy. According to folklore, hares behave as though they're “sparring” with other hares and leaping around for no discernible reason during their breeding season. Their breeding season in Europe begins during the month of March.
See also: hare, mad, march
References in periodicals archive ?
An event organized by a local chapter, or kennel, is known as a hash, hash run or simply hashing, with participants calling themselves hashers or hares and hounds.
Once the hare is spotted the dogs are released to chase and kill the poor, innocent hare.
If food limitation is a key mechanism in the hare cycle, I expect to see dramatically different responses between the two treatments.
The back legs and ears of hares are much longer than those of rabbits.
On June 12, Phil sent him a text asking for drugs and they met later and Hare sold him three bags for PS100.
To see how the hares have fared, the researchers looked for signs of the animals at 199 sites in Wisconsin during the winters of 2012-2013 and 20132014.
For the first-time hare photographer, it is important to research the methods used by others who have succeeded in their quest before you.
The game and fauna fund, in cooperation with the police, issued a search warrant for the establishment after word got out that the man was selling living hares at e1/4120 each to hunters, Anayiotos told the Cyprus Mail .
Mr J Rimington says a lifting of the ban on hunting with dogs will mean hares will be exterminated.
More brown hares have been shot since the ban was started.
This is the first stage of an ongoing monitoring programme to find out the status of the mountain hare population, and in the long term we hope to find out whether the ongoing restoration works are having a positive impact on this iconic species.
In other words, it's all a bit of a stramash, with each male hare in the group seemingly intent on having a go at his nearest neighbour whenever the fancy takes him.
The illustrations are truly beautiful and capture both the magical intent of the story and the illusiveness of the seldom seen hare.
European hares made several appearances in the Conservationist over the years, most notably in a February 1957 feature article aptly titled "The European Hare in New York.