hard to believe


Also found in: Legal.

hard to believe

 and hard to swallow
not easily believed; hardly believable. Her story was hard to swallow, and it finally was proven to be a lie.
See also: believe, hard
References in classic literature ?
At the same time, I find it hard to believe that a successful invasion of this country is within the bounds of possibility.
But truly, forsooth, I find it hard to believe him the same man.
It was hard to believe that that lofty wooded rampart on the left which so overtops the Jungfrau was not actually the higher of the two, but it was not, of course.
You seem to find it hard to believe, but I can assure you that I know nothing.
Something closely analogous to knowledge and desire, as regards its effects on behaviour, exists among animals, even where what we call "consciousness" is hard to believe in; something equally analogous exists in ourselves in cases where no trace of "consciousness" can be found.
It's hard to believe," he murmured, "such a very small girl went away and such a very grown up little woman has come back.
Betts tried hard to believe them the last, though, in his inmost heart, he would a thousand times rather that the woman he loved should smile on a weakness of this sort, in a girl of her own age, than that she should show herself to be prematurely wise, if it was wisdom purchased at the expense of the light-heartedness and sympathies of her years and sex.
My own brother is among those who died to-night; but this is a great matter, and the thing is hard to believe.
I agree in what you are saying, he replied, which may be hard to believe, yet, from another point of view, is harder still to deny.
Behind was the black cave, masked with green thorn, so low that it was hard to believe that a man could enter it.
It is hard to believe that in three months we shall probably be snowed up and certainly be cold.
Yet his wide white beard, cherubic face, and sparkling spectacles, at the numberless dinners and congresses where they appeared, made it hard to believe, somehow, that he had ever been anything so morbid as either a dram-drinker or a Calvinist.
It was hard to believe that amongst so prosaic surroundings of neglect and dust and decay there was any ground for such fear as already we knew.
Moving about the Rome of to-day, we might find it hard to believe in her old magnificence and her millions of population; but with this stubborn evidence before us that she was obliged to have a theatre with sitting room for eighty thousand persons and standing room for twenty thousand more, to accommodate such of her citizens as required amusement, we find belief less difficult.
It was hard to believe, as he looked back over it, that the whole great span was incurably disabled, was already as good as condemned, because something was out of line in the lower chord of the cantilever arm.