happy


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References in classic literature ?
Now I can finish my play," and he looked quite happy.
cried the Swallow, but nobody minded, and when the moon rose he flew back to the Happy Prince.
In the square below," said the Happy Prince, "there stands a little match-girl.
I am covered with fine gold," said the Prince, "you must take it off, leaf by leaf, and give it to my poor; the living always think that gold can make them happy.
You good little Fairies," said Eva, folding them in her arms, for she was no longer the tiny child she had been in Fairy-Land, "you dear good little Elves, what can I ask of you, who have done so much to make me happy, and taught me so many good and gentle lessons, the memory of which will never pass away?
Thus she stood among the waving blossoms, with the Fairy garland in her hair, and happy feelings in her heart, better and wiser for her visit to Fairy-Land.
What a happy woman I am living in a garden, with books, babies, birds, and flowers, and plenty of leisure to enjoy them
There is one happy life less in the garden to-day through my fault, and it is such a lovely, warm day--just the sort of weather for young soft things to enjoy and grow in.
She had often said she wanted to do something splendid, no matter how hard, and now she had her wish, for what could be more beautiful than to devote her life to Father and Mother, trying to make home as happy to them as they had to her?
That always used to make you happy," said her mother once, when the desponding fit over-shadowed Jo.
Do your best, and grow as happy as we are in your success.
As I rode back in the lonely night, the wind going by me like a restless memory, I thought of this, and feared she was not happy.
She meant to be giving her little heart a happy flutter, and filling her with sensations of delightful self-consequence; and, misinterpreting Fanny's blushes, still thought she must be doing so when she went to her after the two first dances, and said, with a significant look, "Perhaps you can tell me why my brother goes to town to-morrow?
She was happy whenever she looked at William, and saw how perfectly he was enjoying himself, in every five minutes that she could walk about with him and hear his account of his partners; she was happy in knowing herself admired; and she was happy in having the two dances with Edmund still to look forward to, during the greatest part of the evening, her hand being so eagerly sought after that her indefinite engagement with him was in continual perspective.
It was barbarous to be happy when Edmund was suffering.