handcuff

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velvet handcuffs

A situation that is undesirable, unenjoyable, or unfulfilling but that provides enough financial security as to make one unwilling or unable to leave. After nearly three years at my mind-numbing job, held back by the velvet handcuffs of my salary and benefits, I decided to break away from it all and go live in Japan.
See also: handcuff, velvet

golden handcuffs

A situation that is undesirable, unenjoyable, or unfulfilling but that provides enough financial security as to make one unwilling or unable to leave. After nearly three years at my mind-numbing job, held back by the golden handcuffs of my salary and benefits, I decided to break away from it all and go live in Japan.
See also: golden, handcuff

golden handcuffs

Financial benefits that an employee will lose upon resigning, as in The company's presented all the middle managers with golden handcuffs, so they can't afford to leave . This slangy business expression dates from the 1970s.
See also: golden, handcuff

golden handcuffs

n. monetary inducements to stay on the job. (see also golden parachute.) The company provided a variety of golden handcuffs to keep its execs happy through a takeover.
See also: golden, handcuff
References in periodicals archive ?
It was the combination of handcuffs being put on improperly and the lack of recognition by hospital and staff concerning the problem being created by the improper handcuffing.
The British Medical Association has also condemned the handcuffing policy.
This incident included such safety-related issues as waiting for backup, handcuffing, and pursuing offenders on foot.
A final incident combined the safety-related issues of searching and handcuffing.
Securing may include placing the subject in the back seat of a police vehicle with a cage, handcuffing the subject to a fixed object safely out of harm's way, or, if departmental policy prohibits either of these, leaving the subject under the control of another officer.
The Los Angeles police no longer would use a controversial restraining technique that involves handcuffing suspects' wrists and ankles behind their backs, under a settlement recommended by police commissioners.
The court held that allegations that a deputy violently handcuffed the arrestee with no justification, and that the handcuffing caused physical injury to the arrestee, were sufficient to state an excessive force claim under the Fourth Amendment.
It is because we consider both the inherent danger of the situation and the intrusiveness of the police action, that pointing a weapon at a suspect, and handcuffing him, or ordering him to lie on the ground, or placing him in a police car will not automatically convert an investigatory stop into an arrest that requires probable cause.
The cause is believed to be a combination of drug abuse, the stress of confrontation with an officer and handcuffing or hogtying.