guppy

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guppy

n. a gay yuppy. They called themselves guppies, because they were young and urban and gay.
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers deployed guppies in several streams as part of a study on evolutionary change.
If guppies were dependent only on carotenoids for their orange coloration, one would expect to find large changes in the color of their orange patches because the availability of algae varies by location.
When we compare those results (redrawn in Figure 2) with the response to the crayfish (right panels in Figure 2), the most striking difference is the willingness of solo guppies to approach the barrier during the chemical-only trial.
Male guppies spend most of their time displaying to females.
Three 10 gallon aquarium tanks filled with de-chlorinated tap water were stocked with guppies and black mollies from a local supplier.
Adult female guppies are the strongest swimmers and now we know they are the best able to colonize new habitats," Reznick said.
Reznick and his various collaborators have been analyzing Trinidad's wild guppies for some 20 years.
Now, UCLA biologists have revealed why has it stayed the same hue of orange over such a long period of time - because that's the colour female guppies prefer.
Studies in the 1980s showed that if researchers stocked artificial streams with aggressive predators, populations of guppies there shifted during 14 generations to subdued coloration.
Washington, July 21 (ANI): A study on guppies - fresh water fishes - has revealed that female guppies that grew rapidly as juveniles produced fewer offspring than usual.
Part of the catfish's tracking success might be due to the chemical trails that the guppies shed into their wake.
Bassar of UC-Riverside, the team used artificial streams-filled with the same spring water and insect larvae found in Trinidad's natural habitats -- to examine whether genetically distinct guppies from upstream or downstream had different effects on ecosystem processes.
Female birds do it, female bees do it, even female guppies in the (freshwater) seas do it.
As part of the study, a research team led by Swanne Pamela Gordon from the University of California, Riverside studied 200 guppies that had been taken from the Yarra River in Trinidad and introduced into two different environments in the nearby Damier River, which previously had no guppies.