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guide someone around something

 and guide someone around
to lead or escort someone on a tour of something or some place. Please let me guide you around the plant, so you can see how we do things here. I would be happy to guide you around.
See also: around, guide

guide someone away from someone or something

 and guide someone away
to lead or escort someone away from someone, something, or some place. (Usually said of someone who requires help or guidance.) A police officer guided the children away from the busy street. Please guide away those people before they bump into your grandmother.
See also: away, guide

guide someone or something across (something)

to lead or escort someone or something across something. I had to guide him across the desert. The bridge was very narrow and Jill got out to guide the truck across. We had to guide it across.
See also: across, guide

guide something away

 (from someone or something)
1. to lead something away from someone or something. I guided the lawn mower away from the children. Please stand there and guide away the cars.
2. to channel or route something away from someone or something. The farmer guided the creek water away from the main channel through a narrow ditch. We had to guide away the sheep from the road.
See also: away, guide

a guiding light/spirit

someone who influences a person or group and shows them how to do something successfully She was the founder of the company, and for forty years its guiding light.
See also: guide, light
References in classic literature ?
SOCRATES: But when we said that a man cannot be a good guide unless he have knowledge (phrhonesis), this we were wrong.
SOCRATES: And a person who had a right opinion about the way, but had never been and did not know, might be a good guide also, might he not?
SOCRATES: And while he has true opinion about that which the other knows, he will be just as good a guide if he thinks the truth, as he who knows the truth?
Will he dare to tell the hot- blooded Scotsman that his children are left without a guide, though Magua promised to be one?
I was born a native of these parts,'' answered their guide, and as he made the reply they stood before the mansion of Cedric; a low irregular building, containing several court-yards or enclosures, extending over a considerable space of ground, and which, though its size argued the inhabitant to be a person of wealth, differed entirely from the tall, turretted, and castellated buildings in which the Norman nobility resided, and which had become the universal style of architecture throughout England.
The journey was resumed at six in the morning; the guide hoped to reach Allahabad by evening.
At two o'clock the guide entered a thick forest which extended several miles; he preferred to travel under cover of the woods.
The guide lights his pipe, and reminds me that he warned us against the weather before we started for our ride.
Our guide, in front of us, answers that it will end in the ponies finding their way certainly to the nearest village or the nearest house.
Jones had not such implicit faith in his guide, but that on their arrival at a village he inquired of the first fellow he saw, whether they were in the road to Bristol.
For, indeed, the guide had no sooner taken his place at the kitchen fire, than he acquainted the whole company with all he knew or had ever heard concerning Jones.
Thereupon, the man of the house, who had hitherto pretended to have no English, and driven me from his door by signals, suddenly began to speak as clearly as was needful, and agreed for five shillings to give me a night's lodging and guide me the next day to Torosay.
For all that he was very courteous and well spoken, made us both sit down with his family to dinner, and brewed punch in a fine china bowl, over which my rascal guide grew so merry that he refused to start.
This was a good diversion to us; but we were still in a wild place, and our guide very much hurt, and what to do we hardly knew; the howling of wolves ran much in my head; and, indeed, except the noise I once heard on the shore of Africa, of which I have said something already, I never heard anything that filled me with so much horror.
These things, and the approach of night, called us off, or else, as Friday would have had us, we should certainly have taken the skin of this monstrous creature off, which was worth saving; but we had near three leagues to go, and our guide hastened us; so we left him, and went forward on our journey.