grudge

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hold a grudge

To harbor persistent and continual resentment or ill feelings toward someone, especially for some slight or wrongdoing they have committed in the past. Johnny has been holding a grudge against me since we were 12 because I embarrassed him in front of a girl he liked. Samantha is just so forgiving—I don't think she's ever held a grudge in her life!
See also: grudge, hold

bear a grudge (against someone)

To remain angry with someone about past slights or misdeeds. Although our disagreement happened months ago, Lily still won't talk to me—clearly, she's bearing a grudge. My sister-in-law bore a grudge against me for years after she found out that I said her wedding dress was ugly.
See also: bear, grudge

bear a grudge (against someone)

 and have a grudge (against someone); hold a grudge (against someone)
to continue feeling an old resentment for someone; to harbor continual anger for someone. She bears a grudge against the judge who sentenced her. I have a grudge against my landlord for not fixing the leaky faucet.
See also: bear, grudge

hold a grudge

(against someone) Go to bear a grudge (against someone).
See also: grudge, hold

nurse a grudge (against someone)

Fig. to keep resenting and disliking someone over a period of time. (Usually implies that it has been an unreasonably long time.) Sally is still nursing a grudge against Mary. How long can anyone nurse a grudge?
See also: grudge, nurse

bear a grudge

Also, have or hold a grudge . Maintain resentment or anger against someone for a past offense. For example, They held up my claim for months, but I won't bear a grudge against them, or His grandfather was always one to hold a grudge. [c. 1600]
See also: bear, grudge

nurse a grudge

Bear resentment for a long time, as in We don't know why Karl looks so angry; I think he's nursing a grudge against the family. This expression uses nurse in the sense of "foster a feeling," a usage dating from the mid-1700s.
See also: grudge, nurse
References in periodicals archive ?
Their mother has gone off on one of her "vacations," and their older sister has decided to emigrate, leaving them in the grudging care of an aunt.
The senator concludes by saying that he thinks gay rights "is an idea whose time is arriving," but his earlier comments show exactly what is really coming: grudging recognition that the GOP will have to embrace, in the interest of gaining votes, an idea whose time is long overdue.
We must move on from grudging acceptance of the National Assembly to an attitude of enthusiastic engagement with the devolution process and look at ways in which the new democracy of Wales can be strengthened and given a more meaningful role in Welsh life,'' added Mr Davies.
As the dispute between Time Warner and Disney illustrates, the days of cooperation, grudging or otherwise, are long gone - the casualty of two factors.
That description outraged leftists--although Krauze's fair-minded appraisal and grudging respect for Ruiz also disgruntled conservatives--and caught the attention of thoughtful Mexicans who care about the conflict but not intellectual infighting.
In the spirit of the Bard's grudging acknowledgement, we take notice of an article in the March/April issue of The Humanist entitled, "What Bush Didn't Want You to Know About Iraq.
She earns first the Marquis's grudging respect, then admiration and finally his love.
But there definitely was this grudging admiration people had for someone who was prepared to stand up against the whole of society and take everything on.
If grudging tolerance is such a good idea for marijuana, why not the same for harder drugs?
There are grudging concessions to cruise ship ambience on Marine Highway vessels.