grod


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grod

and groddess (ˈgrɑd(əs))
n. an especially sloppy man or woman. (Patterned on god and goddess + grody.) Hello, grods and groddesses, what’s new?

King Grod

(...grɑd)
n. a very repellent male. (California.) You are just King Grod! So gross!
See also: Grod, king
References in periodicals archive ?
Grod says I approvingly introduced "contemporary Holodomor deniers and their enablers.
Grod has hired top-name law enforcement trainers like Larry Lein, Rich Grassi and others to help spread the word to the cops.
Schmitt at The Marksman and Grod of The Front Line embody the kind of daring forward thinking that can inspire everyone in the retail firearms industry.
Grod is a 15-year veteran of the firm and oversees Mullin's Insurance Services department, providing efficient and accurate client service.
On Tuesday, Grod leaves for Athens, Greece, to join a sanctioned team of nearly 120 massage therapists from all over the world who will provide their services to Olympic athletes.
During the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, Grod organized a group of sports therapists, marking the first time massage had been available to competitors.
It's like being chosen out of your entire field to go to the Olympics,'' says Grod, owner of Massage Masters Therapy Center in Sherman Oaks.
To offer his services, Grod applied with the Athens Health Services Sports Massage Team, sanctioned by the Games' local organizing body in Greece.
Former Olympic kayaker Julie Leach, who recently received a massage from Grod, says such therapy is vital to athletes because it helps soothe aches and relieve stress.
He's part of the team like anyone else,'' Leach says of Grod.
The trip to Athens is more than just business for Grod, however.
Perhaps it is the most numerous after the Jewish one, Pavlo Grod assured.
ARVIS GRODS, author of numerous prose works that almost all deal with provincial life in Latvia, breaks no new ground in his thematic preoccupations in this his latest collection of stories, yet a new facet does seem to appear in these narratives.
With these three stories, to which Grods has added three selections he calls parables, the author approaches not only little-explored thematic regions beyond the once and still dominant sociorealist mode in Latvian letters, but also introduces tongue-in-cheek ironies and fantasy that invigorate quotidian life.