grip

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get to grips with (someone or something)

To begin or make an effort to understand, accept, and deal with a difficult or problematic person, thing, or situation. I should have the report ready for you by this afternoon, I just need to get to grips with this new software update first. I've tried, but I just can't get to grips with Amy, she's totally out of control!
See also: get, grip

grip on (something)

1. A good physical hold on something. In order to remove the bolt, I needed to get a grip on the wrench.
2. A newfound understanding of a topic or concept. The teacher spent extra time going over the material in class because she wanted her students to have a good grip on the subject matter before they took the exam.
See also: grip, on

grip on (oneself)

Control of one's reactions or emotions. After losing her job, Sarah needed to calm down and get a grip on herself in order to drive home safely. You're not going to be able to think clearly until you get a grip on yourself.
See also: grip, on

be in the grip of

To suffer from or struggle with something that one cannot control. I'm sorry I never called you back, I've been in the grip of illness for days. Many young people can't afford to live on their own because they are in the grip of student loan debt.
See also: grip, of

come to grips with someone or something

Fig. to begin to deal with someone or something difficult or challenging in a sensible way. We must all come to grips with this tragedy. I cannot come to grips with Ed and his problems.
See also: come, grip

grab someone's attention

 and get someone's attention; grip someone's attention
Fig. to draw or attract someone's attention. The bright colors on the poster are there to grab your attention. The scary movie gripped my attention.
See also: attention, grab

*a grip on oneself

Fig. control of one's emotions. (*Typically: get ~ have ~.) Calm down, man! Get a grip on yourself! I encouraged him to get a grip on himself.
See also: grip, on

*a grip on something

 
1. and *a hold on something Lit. a good grasp on something. (*Typically: get ~ have ~ give someone ~.) Try to get a grip on the ropes and pull yourself up. You should get a hold on the knob and turn it firmly.
2. Fig. a thorough knowledge of some topic. (*Typically: get ~ have ~ give someone ~.) I need to have a grip on the basics of accounting. Try to get a hold on all the facts first.
See also: grip, on

keep a firm grip on someone or something

 and keep a tight grip on someone or something 
1. Lit. to hold on to someone or something tightly. As they approached the edge, Sally kept a firm grip on little Timmy. She kept a tight grip on him. Keep a firm grip on my hand as we cross the street.
2. Fig. to keep someone or something under firm control. The manager keeps a firm grip on all the employees. I try to keep a firm grip on all the accounts.
See also: firm, grip, keep, on

lose one's hold on someone or something

 and lose one's grip on someone or something 
1. Lit. to fail to keep one's handhold on someone or something. I lost my hold on the child, and she nearly slipped away. She lost her grip on the bag of jewels and it fell overboard.
2. and lose one's hold over someone or something Fig. to give up control over someone or something. The manager lost her hold on her employees and was fired. Fred is losing his grip on his workers. He is losing his hold over his empire.
See also: hold, lose, on

take a firm grip on someone or something

 
1. Lit. to grasp someone or something tightly. The police officer took a firm grip on Fred and led him to the squad car. Mary took a firm grip on the handle and pulled hard.
2. Fig. to gain control of someone or something. You will have to take a firm grip on Andrew. He has a mind of his own. Someone needs to take a firm grip on this department and get it organized.
See also: firm, grip, on, take

get a grip (on yourself)

(spoken)
to control your emotions I know it's hard, but get a grip on yourself and tell me what you saw. Oh, get a grip, Tess! It's really not as bad as you think.
See also: get, grip

get a grip (on something)

to understand how to deal with something The program will have helpful tips on how to get a grip on your finances. Something is obviously not right in our organization, and we must get a grip on the problem.
See also: get, grip

in the grip of something

controlled by something The country was in the grip of a continuing and deep depression. She sways and stomps and even cries when she's in the grip of her music-making.
See also: grip, of

lose your/its grip

to be unable to control something Changes in your body can make you feel like you're losing your grip. For many years now the old political parties have been losing their grip on the South. Related vocabulary: lose it
See also: grip, lose

come to grips with something

to make an effort to understand and deal with a problem or situation The whole community is struggling to come to grips with these kids' deaths.
Related vocabulary: come to terms with something
See also: come, grip

be in the grip of something

to be experiencing something unpleasant that you have no control over The country is currently in the grip of the worst recession for twenty years.
See also: grip, of

get a grip (on yourself)

to make an effort to control your emotions and behave more calmly Come on, get a grip, we've got an important meeting in five minutes. I just think he ought to get a grip on himself - he's behaving like a child.
See also: get, grip

have a grip on something

to have control over something Certainly in the first half England didn't seem to have a grip on the game.
See lose grip
See also: grip, have, on

come/get to grips with something

to make an effort to understand and deal with a problem or situation It's further proof of the government's failure to get to grips with two of the most important social issues of our time.
See also: come, grip

lose your grip

to lose your ability to control or deal with a situation He was losing his grip at work and knew it was time to retire. (often + on ) It suggests that the ruling party is losing its grip on the middle classes in some of the bigger cities.
See also: grip, lose

come to grips with

Confront squarely, deal decisively with, as in Her stories help the children come to grips with upsetting events. This term, sometimes put as get to grips with, employs grip in the sense of a "tight hold." [Mid-1900s]
See also: come, grip

get a grip on

Also, have a grip on. Obtain mastery or control over something or someone. For example, Get a grip on yourself or the reporters will give you a hard time, or, as Arthur Conan Doyle put it in Sherlock Holmes (1894): "I have a grip on the essential facts of the case." This expression transfers a firm physical hold to emotional or intellectual control. [Late 1800s]
See also: get, grip, on

lose one's grip

Also lose it.
1. Fail to maintain control or one's ability to function, as in Ted wasn't running things the way he used to, and his boss thought he might be losing his grip , or I thought I was losing it when I couldn't remember the words to that old song. The first term dates from the mid-1800s, the slangy variant from the mid-1900s.
2. Fail to keep one's composure, as in When Billy broke the window, Dad just lost his grip and let him have it, or I just can't deal with this many visitors-I must be losing it. [Slang; first half of 1900s] Also see lose one's temper.
See also: grip, lose

in the grip of the grape

mod. drunk on wine; drunk. Wayne was in the grip of the grape and couldn’t talk straight.
See also: grape, grip, of

key grip

n. the head laborer on a movie set. (Filmmaking.) The key grip has a complaint that could hold up production.
See also: grip, key

lose one’s grip

and lose one’s hold
tv. to lose one’s control over something. When I begin to lose my grip, I will just quit. The old man is clearly losing his hold.
See also: grip, lose

come to grips with

To confront squarely and attempt to deal decisively with: "He had to come to grips with the proposition" (Louis Auchincloss).
See also: come, grip
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet, thanks to another of Vincenzi's trademarks - an ability to write both concisely and grippingly - you are almost seamlessly swept along.
16 /PRNewswire/ -- OVERVIEW: Inspired by a true story, "American Gangster," the grippingly intense crime-thriller acclaimed by critics and audiences as one of the best films of 2007, will be available in two versions on the exclusive "American Gangster" 2-Disc Unrated Extended Edition DVD that includes both an unrated, extended movie with over 18 additional minutes and an alternate ending PLUS the original theatrical film.
Tuesday sees a potential rape storyline touchingly, cleverly and grippingly dealt with.
Grippingly depicting the intricacies of the "Real ID Act" and the United States National Identification System, The Cattle carries readers through the entire process as systems are developed and tested in a sense of the "Mark of the Beast" lore.
Her book, A Shape of My Own, a grippingly honest account of life with anorexia nervosa is Grace's heartbreaking, shocking and inspirational story.
In a nutshell: Complicated, multistory look at corruption in the international oil trade is more informative than grippingly entertaining, but always smart and rich with fascinating moments.
The result was a grippingly wrought opening movement, its storm and stress balanced by lucid phrasing, the Scherzo and Trio a startling drama and a slow movement lilting between graceful and serene melody.
That's the overwhelming message which emerges from Elmina's Kitchen, a grippingly powerful drama about gang culture and Yardies set against the backdrop of a West Indian cafe in Hackney.
Gibson's proposal to make a grippingly realistic and reverent film about the final hours in the life of Jesus Christ, including His brutal scourging and crucifixion, was rejected by every studio.
Sydney Glover, of what the magazine intends to do; it begins, without any preamble, with a grippingly written article on the concelament of Van Eyck's Ghent Altarpiece during World War I (an extract appears in 'From the Archives' on page 96).
The tension of the finale was grippingly conveyed, with triumphal blasts from horns and trumpets at its climax.
But in the minute detail with which the author examines the few decades of the Modernist landscape tradition it gets a bit boring: you wade through the endless instances of competitions and schemes which didn't win and great built examples and wonder whether there is anything grippingly interesting on the other side.
Unless the director is artist Julian Schnabel (Basquiat), who has made something gloriously visual and grippingly cinematic from the life of the late Cuban poet Reinaido Arenas.
Unclouded by this ambiguity, Twelve Grand portrays its thirsty lead manand the stagger of his chaotic life enjoyably and often grippingly.
I don't think it's that I'm a lazy anti-science philistine--for example, I devoured a book that covered some of Pinker's ground more grippingly, Robert Wright's The Moral Animal.