grin

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coprophagous grin

A smug, self-satisfied, or overly pleased smile, especially one that (intentionally or unintentionally) irritates others. A humorous literalization of the phrase "shit-eating grin" (where coprophagia, or coprophagy, means the ingestion of feces). She's been walking around with that coprophagous grin on her face ever since she found out she got into Harvard.
See also: grin

fish-eating grin

A smug, self-satisfied, or overly pleased smile, especially one that (intentionally or unintentionally) irritates others. She's been walking around with that fish-eating grin on her face ever since she found out she got into Harvard.
See also: grin

pie-eating grin

A smug, self-satisfied, or overly pleased smile, especially one that (intentionally or unintentionally) irritates others. She's been walking around with that pie-eating grin on her face ever since she found out she got into Harvard.
See also: grin

plastic grin

A forced, artificial smile; a smile someone wears despite having no feelings of happiness or joy. John seemed fine at first glance, but before long I could tell that he was wearing a plastic grin and that something was bothering him. Look at his big plastic grin—he's such a con man! I sure hope he doesn't win the election.
See also: grin, plastic

grin like a Cheshire cat

To smile smugly or mischievously. The term was popularized by the character in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. I knew he had a prank planned for April Fools' Day when he arrived at work grinning like a Cheshire cat.
See also: cat, Cheshire, grin, like

shit-eating grin

rude slang A facial expression denoting arrogance, smugness, or self-satisfaction. Primarily heard in US. I really wanted to wipe that shit-eating grin off his face after he won the poker game.
See also: grin

grin and bear it

Fig. to endure something unpleasant in good humor. There is nothing you can do but grin and bear it. I hate having to work for rude people. I guess I have to grin and bear it.
See also: and, bear, grin

grin at someone or something

 
1. to smile a beaming smile at someone or something. The entire class grinned at the camera. I grinned at her and she turned away quickly. 2. to smile a beaming smile at the thought of, or mental picture of, someone or something. He grinned at the thought of his coming home to his family. He grinned at her as she gazed upon the diamond ring he had given her.
See also: grin

grin from ear to ear

Fig. to smile a very wide, beaming smile. She was grinning from ear to ear as she accepted the prize. We knew Timmy was happy because he was grinning from ear to ear.
See also: ear, grin

grin from ear to ear

also smile from ear to ear
to give a very big smile He was grinning from ear to ear, as if he had just won the lottery.
See also: ear, grin

grin and bear it

to accept something unpleasant with good humor Bad things happen and you just have to learn to grin and bear it.
See also: and, bear, grin

grin/smile from ear to ear

to look extremely happy (usually in continuous tenses) We've had a fantastic response,' he said, grinning from ear to ear.
See also: ear, grin

a grin like a Cheshire cat

a very wide smile
Usage notes: The Cheshire cat is a character in Lewis Carroll's book Alice in Wonderland and is famous for its big smile.
I just presumed he'd got the job because he walked in here with a grin like a Cheshire cat.
See also: cat, Cheshire, grin, like

grin and bear it

to accept an unpleasant or difficult situation because there is nothing you can do to improve it I don't want to spend the whole weekend working but I guess I'll just have to grin and bear it.
See grin from ear to ear
See also: and, bear, grin

a shit-eating grin

  (American taboo)
a look of extreme satisfaction on someone's face that is annoying to other people who are less happy Ever since she heard they'd won she's been sitting there with that shit-eating grin on her face.
See also: grin

grin and bear it

Put up good-humoredly with adversity, with good humor, as in It's no fun being sick for the holidays, but you might as well grin and bear it. Also put as grin and abide in the 19th century, this expression became so well known that Sam Walter Foss (1858-1911) made a pun on it in his poem, "The Firm of Grin and Barrett": "Never yet was any panic Scared the firm of Grin and Barrett."
See also: and, bear, grin

grin like a Cheshire cat

Smile broadly, especially in a self-satisfied way. For example, John ended the set with a beautiful serve, an ace, and couldn't help grinning like a Cheshire cat . The ultimate origin of this expression, appearing in print since the late 1700s, is disputed, but its most famous exponent was Lewis Carroll, in whose Alice's Adventures in Wonderland the grinning cat gradually vanished from view, with its grin the last part to vanish.
See also: cat, Cheshire, grin, like

big fat grin

and BFG
phr. & comp. abb. I’m smiling while I write this. Just kidding! BFG.
See also: big, fat, grin

tin grin

n. a smile with a mouth having braces. I’ll be glad when I get rid of this tin grin.
See also: grin, tin
References in classic literature ?
I've often seen a cat without a grin,' thought Alice;
It was the first word of kindness the child had ever heard in her life; and the sweet tone and manner struck strangely on the wild, rude heart, and a sparkle of something like a tear shone in the keen, round, glittering eye; but it was followed by the short laugh and habitual grin.
The snores were almost apoplectic; but the grin was not quite so big.
Here Gagool was waiting for us, still with that evil grin upon her horrid face.
Then the grin died away, and his face grew bleak and serious.
It always caused him to grin a trifle when he looked at these strange creatures.
The grin of derision faded from Tarzan's lips as the pain and the hot blood aroused his fighting instincts.
Ay, ay, you need not mention it, I protest: we understand what that fate is very well," cries Dowling, with a most facetious grin.
Pulled it off," said Chunk with Elysium in his grin.
It seemed as though his features had frozen into a diabolical grin at the world he had left and outwitted.
He continued to grin with a sardonic humour, with a cynical mockery and defiance.
The Jew thrust his head out of the room door when Sikes had left it; looked after him as we walked up the dark passage; shook his clenched fist; muttered a deep curse; and then, with a horrible grin, reseated himself at the table; where he was soon deeply absorbed in the interesting pages of the Hue-and-Cry.
exclaimed the old man with a grin, as he stood in the middle of the road with the gate half-closed, watching the chaise which rapidly diminished in the increasing distance.
The postillions, each with a broad grin convulsing his countenance, were viewing the adverse party from their saddles, and Mr.
With his head sunk down between his shoulders, and a hideous grin over-spreading his face, the dwarf stood up and stretched his short arm across the table.