grievance

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air (one's) grievances

To express one's dissatisfaction. The employees used the meeting to air their grievances about their salaries and working conditions.
See also: air, grievance

air one's grievances

Fig. to complain; to make a public complaint. I know how you feel, John, but it isn't necessary to air your grievances over and over.
See also: air, grievance

air one's grievances

Complain publicly, as in Jane was afraid to complain at work but freely aired her grievances at home. This figurative exposure to the open air is far from new; to air one's opinions or ideas dates from the early 1800s, and the precise idiom appears in James Joyce's Ulysses (1922).
See also: air, grievance
References in classic literature ?
This grievance dated back to the middle years of the last century, when, owing to some official intrigue, his merits had been passed over in a disgraceful manner in favor of another, his junior.
To oblige the great body of the yeomanry, and of the other classes of the citizens, to be under arms for the purpose of going through military exercises and evolutions, as often as might be necessary to acquire the degree of perfection which would entitle them to the character of a well-regulated militia, would be a real grievance to the people, and a serious public inconvenience and loss.
To remedy this grievance, it was provided by a statute in the reign of Charles II, that the intermissions should not be protracted beyond a period of three years.
The friend, with a grievance in his eye, went to the youth.
But the very extent of his ownership, thus perpetually brought before him, created a fresh sense of grievance.
Perhaps Zeena had failed to see the new doctor or had not liked his counsels: Ethan knew that in such cases the first person she met was likely to be held responsible for her grievance.
What was needed was a sense of justice and a sympathy with European affairs, but a remote sympathy not dulled by petty interests; a moral superiority over those sovereigns of the day who co-operated with him; a mild and attractive personality; and a personal grievance against Napoleon.
For three days the old man had brooded over his grievance, seeking for some means to be revenged upon the King for the insult which Henry had put upon him.
He pumped Morrison, the clerk, who had first to vent his personal grievance against Miss Mason before he could tell what little he knew of her.
She imagined herself, in an exasperating future, as a scrawny woman with an eternal grievance.
A few words from the prince disposed of each case, and, if the applicant liked not the judgment, a quick glance from the prince's dark eyes sent him to the door with the grievance all gone out of him.
She sighed again, and at last the particular grievance was remembered.
Neither of them gave full utterance to their sense of grievance, but they considered each other in the wrong, and tried on every pretext to prove this to one another.
I told you, the last time you were here with a grievance, that you had better turn about and come out of that.
At the man's were a Member, an Engineer, a Payer-off of the National Debt, a Poem on Shakespeare, a Grievance, and a Public Office, who all seem to be utter strangers to Veneering.