References in classic literature ?
Consequently, they do not dig graves, they blast them out with power and fuse.
The doctor put the lantern at the head of the grave and came and sat down with his back against one of the elm trees.
The Lady Rowena must complete two years' mourning, as for a betrothed husband all our Saxon ancestors would disown us were we to treat of a new union for her ere the grave of him she should have wedded him, so much the most worthy of her hand by birth and ancestry is yet closed.
They then strewed upon the grave a profusion of flowers and branches, and all expressing their condolence with his friend ambrosio, took their Vivaldo and his companion did the same; and Don Quixote bade farewell to his hosts and to the travellers, who pressed him to come with them to Seville, as being such a convenient place for finding adventures, for they presented themselves in every street and round every corner oftener than anywhere else.
We dug the grave, and the polypi undertake to seal our dead for eternity.
Her gentle and timid spirit sinks within her; and, turning away from the window, she sits down in the great chair and wonders whereabouts in the wilderness her friends will dig her grave.
tis a pleasure, children, and the greatest that is left me on this side the grave.
On came the hoof tramps and the voices of the riders, two grave old voices, conversing soberly as they drew near.
Entering the great Rotunda, we stand before the most sacred locality in Christendom--the grave of Jesus.
And so the white-haired old man repeated the burial service over this strange grave, while his four companions stood with bowed and uncovered heads about him.
He arose from the oaken bench on which he was seated in the chapel, and wished, as the priest had done, to go and bid a last adieu to the double grave which contained his two lost friends.
Why my uncle Podger has a tomb in Kensal Green Cemetery, that is the pride of all that country-side; and my grandfather's vault at Bow is capable of accommodating eight visitors, while my great-aunt Susan has a brick grave in Finchley Churchyard, with a headstone with a coffee- pot sort of thing in bas-relief upon it, and a six-inch best white stone coping all the way round, that cost pounds.
John's, for, if he be of any pretensions at all, he has an ancestor buried there, with a queer, crooked slab at his head, or else sprawling protectively over the grave, on which all the main facts of his history are recorded.
Well, you fellows might have had sense enough to suspect that he would return to her grave some time.
The Story Girl selected the spot for the grave, in a little corner behind the cherry copse, where early violets enskied the grass in spring, and we boys dug the grave, making it "soft and narrow," as the heroine of the old ballad wanted hers made.