grant


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to grant: Cary Grant, Ulysses S Grant

granted no quarter

To be offered no mercy, concession, or indulgence. We are at war with barbarians, soldier. You will be granted no quarter if you are taken captive; likewise, you shall grant them no quarter should you take them alive. This match determines if we're heading to the finals of the tournament, so make sure they are granted no quarter!
See also: grant, quarter

be taken for granted

1. To be considered innately true, real, or correct; to be anticipated as always being available or at hand. The plenitude of our natural resources has been taken for granted by people for most of human history. I guess we had taken for granted that our kids would stick around this town and take care of us when we get older.
2. To be underestimated or undervalued; to not be properly appreciated or recognized. I've decided to go out and start my own business, because I'm sick of being taken for granted in this huge corporation.
See also: grant, taken

grant someone no quarter

 and give someone no quarter
Fig. not to allow someone any mercy or indulgence. (Originally meant to refuse to imprison and simply to kill one's prisoner.) The professor was harsh on lazy students. During class, he granted them no quarter.
See also: grant, quarter

grant something to someone

to give or award something to someone. The foundation granted a large sum of money to Jane for her research. They granted an award to Kelly.
See also: grant

take someone or something for granted

to expect someone or something to be always available to serve in some way without thanks or recognition; to value someone or something too lightly. I wish you didn't take me for granted. I guess that I take a lot of things for granted.
See also: grant, take

not take anything for granted

to question everything, including what is usually accepted as true He did not take his luck for granted and worked constantly to be an even better dancer.
Usage notes: also used in the form take nothing for granted: The president took nothing for granted and worked hard to gain the support of Congress.
Opposite of: take something for granted
See also: anything, grant, not, take

take somebody for granted

to fail to appreciate someone When your own children are growing up, you tend to take them for granted, and then, suddenly, they are grown up. Politicians seem to take voters for granted, except when they face a serious challenge.
Usage notes: usually said about someone who is not appreciated because you think they will always be available
See also: grant, take

take something for granted

1. to fail to appreciate the value of something So many of us take clean water for granted.
2. to accept something as true without questioning or testing it We take it for granted that our children will be better off than we are. Opposite of: not take anything for granted
See also: grant, take

take it for granted

to believe that something is true without first thinking about it or making sure that it is true (usually + that ) I'd always seen them together and just took it for granted that they were married.
See also: grant, take

take somebody for granted

to not show that you are grateful to someone for helping you or that you are happy they are with you, often because they have helped you or been with you so often One of the problems with relationships is that after a while you begin to take each other for granted.
See also: grant, take

take something for granted

to expect something to be available all the time and forget that you are lucky to have it We take so many things for granted in this country - like having hot water whenever we need it.
See also: grant, take

take for granted

1. Consider as true or real, anticipate correctly, as in I took it for granted that they'd offer to pay for their share but I was wrong. [c. 1600]
2. Underestimate the value of, become used to, as in The editors felt that the publisher was taking them for granted.
See also: grant, take

take for granted

1. To consider as true, real, or forthcoming; anticipate correctly.
2. To underestimate the value of: a publisher who took the editors for granted.
See also: grant, take
References in periodicals archive ?
Foreign recipient organization uses the grant for activities consistent with the grantor's exempt purpose;
This funding opportunity will use the NIH Exploratory/Development Research Grant (R21) award mechanism.
The exercise price of $25 equals the fair value of a share on the grant date.
In August 2002 the Illinois Higher Education Center (IHEC) for Alcohol, Other Drug and Violence Prevention at Eastern Illinois University initiated a grant competition targeted at institutions of higher education in the state of Illinois.
She got the grant on her first attempt after seeing an advertisement about the grant competition in the Miami Herald.
Although Shelley was under fire for mismanaging his office, he is the subject of an ongoing investigation into the circumstances surrounding his helping to secure, while a member of the Assembly, a $500,000 state grant to build a community center in San Francisco.
8 million grant is being used in Pima County to purchase protective gear and hold trainings for first responders.
Grants Online will improve IT efficiencies for all NOAA line offices and business units as they relate to the entire grant life cycle.
At a time when many communities, through their elected officials, are asking law enforcement agencies to do more with less, using grant funds to supplement departmental budgets provides a perfect route toward achieving their goals.
2) RSA-ISTITUTO NAZIONALE GRANT FOR FLORENCE -- The RSA has entered into an agreement with the Istituto Nazionale di Studi sul Rinascimento in Florence to award one research grant for research in Florence.
The new report also coincides with the launch of an advertising campaign designed to increase awareness of the WTC Business Recovery Grant Program and the Small Firm Attraction and Retention Grant Program, as well as encourage businesses to visit the business rebuilding walk-in centers.
The expanded Cal Grant program was brand-new, and the average person on the street didn't understand its complexities," says Robert Caret, president of San Jose State University.
Mama, pay attention," Grant will say before he tells her something else she doesn't want to hear.
By Julia Grant (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1998.
Armey (R-TX) who, along with his conservative cronies in Congress, has tried to eliminate funding for the National Endowment for the Arts, but rather a group of Seattle arts activists who applied for a grant of $98 million--the NEA's entire 1998 budget.