grand

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grand poobah

The most important or powerful person in a group, organization, business, or movement (e.g., the boss, leader, etc.). I think it sounds like a great idea, but you'll have to ask the grand poobah first.
See also: grand

grand slam

1. In the card game bridge, the winning of all thirteen tricks on one deal of the game. I've been playing bridge for years, but I've still never been able to make a grand slam.
2. In baseball, a homerun that is achieved when all three bases have runners on them. It looked like the home team was in for a sure loss, but a grand slam at the last minute edged them ahead of their opponents.
3. (sometimes capitalized) In sports, the winning of all major championships or tournaments in a single year, especially in tennis or golf. The young player shocked the tennis world by winning a Grand Slam in her first year at the professional level.
4. By extension, any total, sweeping victory or success. With the Ohio votes in her favor, it looks like the new president has managed a grand slam.
See also: grand, slam

grand total

The final amount after adding several different numbers or sums. After everything was accounted for, the cost of remodeling the kitchen came to a grand total of $4,500.
See also: grand, total

grand tour

1. An extended tour or sightseeing trip in, through, or across any country or region. Originally used in specific reference to the major cities of Europe, the trip was considered a necessary part of well-bred gentlemen's upbringing. It was later extended to travel in general. I've been saving up all year long for my grand tour through France.
2. By extension, a comprehensive, guided tour, inspection, or survey. This is your first time seeing our new house, right? Let me give you the grand tour! The general insisted on a grand tour of all the sites that are still operational.
See also: grand, tour

grand scheme

The long term; the complete picture of something. Typically used in the phrase "in the grand scheme of things." I know you're worried about getting a bad grade on this test, but you're such a great student that I doubt it will matter in the grand scheme of things.
See also: grand, scheme

in the (grand) scheme of things

In the long term; in the complete picture of something. I know you're worried about getting a bad grade on this test, but you're such a great student that I doubt it will matter in the grand scheme of things.
See also: of, scheme, thing

the grand old man of (something)

The most senior and respected man in a particular organization, society, etc. His decades of hosting charity balls and galas have made him the grand old man of London.
See also: grand, man, of, old

a grand old age

A very old age. My grandfather passed away this weekend. He lead a remarkable life and lived to a grand old age.
See also: age, grand, old

the grand old age of

The very old age of. My grandfather passed away this weekend. He lead a remarkable life and lived to the grand old age of 98.
See also: age, grand, of, old

Grand Central Station

A place that is very busy or chaotic, like New York City's Grand Central Terminal train station. The benefits area of our HR department becomes like Grand Central Station once open enrollment starts. So many people coming and going—geez, it's like Grand Central Station in here.
See also: central, grand, station

granddad

slang Someone who acts in an outdated and uncool manner. Oh, he's a real granddad. He'll never go to a club with us.

*busy as a beaver (building a new dam)

 and *busy as a bee; *busy as a one-armed paperhanger; *busy as Grand Central Station; *busy as a cat on a hot tin roof; *busy as a fish peddler in Lent; *busy as a cranberry merchant (at Thanksgiving); *busy as popcorn on a skillet
very busy. (*Also: as ~.) My boss keeps me as busy as a one-armed paperhanger. I don't have time to talk to you. I'm as busy as a beaver. When the tourist season starts, this store is busy as Grand Central Station. Sorry I can't go to lunch with you. I'm as busy as a beaver building a new dam. Prying into other folks' business kept him busy as popcorn on a skillet.
See also: beaver, busy

busy as a beaver

Also, busy as a bee. Hardworking, very industrious, as in With all her activities, Sue is always busy as a bee, or Bob's busy as a beaver trying to finish painting before it rains. The comparison to beavers dates from the late 1700s, the variant from the late 1300s. Also see eager beaver; work like a beaver.
See also: beaver, busy

grand slam

A sweeping success or total victory, as in This presentation gave us a grand slam-every buyer placed an order. This term originated in the early 1800s in the card game of whist (forerunner of contract bridge), where it refers to the taking of all thirteen tricks. It later was extended to bridge and various sports, where it has different meanings: in baseball, a home run hit with runners on all the bases, resulting in four runs for the team; in tennis, winning all four national championships in a single calendar year; in golf, winning all four major championships. In the 1990s the term was used for four related proposals presented on a ballot at once.
See also: grand, slam

grand tour

A comprehensive tour, survey, or inspection. For example, They took me on a grand tour of their new house, or The new chairman will want to make a grand tour of all the branches. Starting in the late 1600s this term was used for a tour of the major European cities, considered essential to a well-bred man's education. In the mid-1800s it was extended to more general use.
See also: grand, tour

a big kahuna

or

a grand kahuna

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
A big kahuna is a very important person in an organization. Suncorp Metway big kahuna Steve Jones may be thinking twice about his plans to start a business in North Queensland. Note: The word `kahuna' is from Hawaiian and means `wise man'.
See also: big, kahuna

a (or the) grand old man of

a man long and highly respected in a particular field.
Recorded from 1882 , and popularly abbreviated as GOM, Grand Old Man was the nickname of the British statesman William Ewart Gladstone ( 1809–98 ), who went on to win his last election in 1892 at the age of eighty-three.
See also: grand, man, of, old

a/the ˌgrand old ˈage

a great age: She finally learned to drive at the grand old age of 65.
See also: age, grand, old

a/the ˌgrand old ˈman (of something)

an old man who is very experienced and respected in a particular profession, etc: At eighty, he is the grand old man of the British film industry.
See also: grand, man, old

grand

and G and gee and large
n. one thousand dollars. That car probably cost about twenty grand. You owe me three gees! He won three large on the slots!

Grand Central Station

n. any busy and hectic place. (From Grand Central Station in New York City—a very busy place.) At just about closing time, this place becomes Grand Central Station.
See also: central, grand, station

granddad

n. an old-fashioned person; an out-of-date person. Don’t be such a granddad. Live a little.
References in periodicals archive ?
The pleasure of power is to remove the fangs of the constitution, and to manipulate its articles and its grandness.
The track's grandness is a mixed blessing because much of the action takes place in the distance, but the facilities, now a mixture of good and not good enough, could be improved to make Fairyhouse a truly premier racecourse.
The intention of every walk is to enable visitors to not only see Chicago in all its grandness but to feel its energy and to know its heart.
Additional factors that influenced the students' affect were ease of access, finding information quickly, grandness of the Web, and ability to browse and search.
If John Paul is eventually remembered as "the Great," it will be for the grandness of his failures as well as his successes.
By the end, you do start to pick holes and it does start to get overtaken by its own sense of grandness.
The grandness and the range of scale, from gross patterns in the rock record to global geochemical cycles to cell metabolism, are captivating.
L'allegro's tempo, contrary to the slower andante on which Mozart dwelt on the string of grandness of love, presented a livelier cheerful beginning for the whole piece that concluded with the faster and more-tense tempo of presto.
Finally, near the end of it all, we will drag some magnificent conifer indoors and think its grandness complete only when we have topped the whole with an angel the likes of whom none of us has ever seen.
The superbly comfortable chair can supply any office, lounge or conference room with an atmosphere of international grandness.
And yet grandness at the height of the Empire was not enough, as years of fierce rule by the Mahdi demonstrated.
The grandness of the claims aside, what Writing America Black does do is modest but important work.
Compared to my two favored pianists in this work, Giles (DG) and Kovacevich (Philips), she appears slightly mechanical, never quite expressing either the grandness of the first movement or the poetry of the slow movement, but she does playfully dance about in the closing part.
You'll be surprised how gorgeous the surroundings will look and your guests will be impressed with the grandness of it all.