grammar Nazi

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Related to grammar: Grammar check
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grammar Nazi

Someone who insists on correcting or criticizing others for errors in spelling, grammar, and syntax, especially to a pedantic or self-righteous degree. Potentially offensive due to its reference to the fascist National Socialist German Workers' Party, which was brought to power in 1933 under Adolf Hitler. It irritates me to no end when people use "good" as an adverb, but I try not to be a grammar Nazi about it.
References in classic literature ?
If I had not loved mackerel I should not have been thirsty;" said Rebecca with an April smile, as she closed her grammar.
The students who came first seemed to be fond of memorizing long and complicated "rules" in grammar and mathematics, but had little thought or knowledge of applying these rules to their everyday affairs of their life.
How do you think you would write or speak about anything more difficult, if you knew no more of grammar than he does?
I shouldn't care, I should leave off," said Ben, with a sense that this was an agreeable issue where grammar was concerned.
They give us an advantage over all other colleges, because at no loss of time our boys become thoroughly conversant with Greek and Latin, Mathematics and Geography, Grammar and Literature.
He remembered his wrestle with the grammar, and dictated.
Your grammar is - " She had intended saying "awful," but she amended it to "is not particularly good.
Why, uncle, we did study English grammar, and I could parse beautifully.
I dallied with little home clubs wherein we discussed poetry and art and the nuances of grammar.
Good-by, then, and remember me to the grammar schools, to the high schools, and even to the colleges if you meet them on the way.
I have lived to a fine purpose, truly, if I am to be taught my grammar at this time of day.
Tibby put a marker in the leaves of his Chinese Grammar and helped them.
Hump, I have studied some grammar in my time, and I think your tenses are tangled.
But Vassily Lukitch was thinking of nothing but the necessity of learning the grammar lesson for the teacher, who was coming at two.
He had not been there a fortnight before it was evident to him that life, complicated not only with the Latin grammar but with a new standard of English pronunciation, was a very difficult business, made all the more obscure by a thick mist of bash fulness.