graduate from

graduate from (something)

1. To complete one's studies in a particular school or program. I can't believe we're about to graduate from college—how did four years go by that quickly? I graduate from my doctoral program in May.
2. To advance to a higher rank. At the end of the summer, I'll graduate from being a junior counselor to being a regular camp counselor.
See also: graduate

graduate from

v.
1. To move up from one position, rank, or level, to a higher one: That year, the athletes graduated from amateur to professional status in the competition.
2. To complete the academic requirements of some institution, usually receiving an academic degree: I graduated from college with a degree in history.
See also: graduate
References in periodicals archive ?
Even as an increasing percentage of black Americans graduate from college -- often, the first in their family to do so -- they remain more likely to need to borrow to finance their undergraduate education, and the borrowing gap between the races has stayed, in percentage-point terms, about as wide for 2000-2014 graduates as in earlier decades.
Every single 02 graduate from the B-52 course deployed--to mission planning cells, the Combined Air Operations Center (CAOC) and as combat fliers.
Critically, reform efforts have done little to improve the rate at which students graduate from a regular high school program by the typical age of 18 years.
This gives us an estimate of the annual graduation rate--the percentage of each class of schoolchildren that goes on to graduate from high school.
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