gracious

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good gracious

A mild exclamation of surprise, alarm, dismay, annoyance, or exasperation. Good gracious, look at the time! How is it nearly midnight already? Good gracious, Bill, would it kill you to take out the trash once in a while? Good gracious, that cyclist nearly hit me!
See also: good, gracious

goodness gracious

A mild exclamation of surprise, alarm, dismay, annoyance, or exasperation. Goodness gracious, look at the time! How is it nearly midnight already? Goodness gracious, Bill, would it kill you to take out the trash once in a while? Goodness gracious, that cyclist nearly hit me!
See also: goodness, gracious

goodness gracious me

A mild exclamation of surprise, alarm, dismay, annoyance, or exasperation. Goodness gracious me, look at the time! How is it nearly midnight already? Goodness gracious me, I'll never get this report finished on time!
See also: goodness, gracious

oh my goodness gracious

A mild exclamation of surprise, alarm, dismay, annoyance, or exasperation. Oh my goodness gracious, what a generous gift! Oh my goodness gracious! Don't scare me like that!
See also: goodness, gracious, oh

(a) gracious plenty

 and an elegant sufficiency
Euph. enough (food). No more, thanks. I have a gracious plenty on my plate. At Thanksgiving, we always have an elegant sufficiency and are mighty thankful for it.
See also: gracious, plenty

goodness gracious

Also, good gracious; gracious sakes. Exclamation of surprise, dismay, or alarm, as in Goodness gracious! You've forgotten your ticket. Both goodness and gracious originally alluded to the good (or grace) of God, but these colloquial expressions, which date from the 1700s, are not considered either vulgar or blasphemous.
See also: goodness, gracious
References in periodicals archive ?
If the right candidate wins, it's simply something "God has graciously granted.
Gary Bencivenga graciously told us, "The recent excerpt doesn't pay off the headline, at least not in an obvious manner.
Above all, I would like to thank John Braithwaite for his international leadership, as scholar and activist, in the effort to build more just and democratic societies throughout the world, and for graciously agreeing to read and respond to the articles included here.
By miraculously providing for the prophet, the widow, and her son, God graciously guarantees that God's Word will not be silenced.
No other colleges could have handled the situation more graciously and professionally than Kansas and North Carolina.
Jim Taulman, scheduled to retire on December 31, 2002, has graciously agreed to continue serving in a part-time capacity until June 15.
By the end of the service, he graciously struggled to find words about that day.
Rockwell fielded the protests graciously, explaining that the post office was a small operation, in a tiny town, with a few boxes of mail to sort, and the postal clerk had succumbed to boredom and human curiosity: ".
The following reviewers at-large graciously provided editorial assistance:
They (Army leaders) genuinely understand the situation in Okinawa and diligently persist in efforts aimed towards developing relationships with local Okinawan people and graciously support various community events sponsored by Naha City.
Until now, the American Running Association has graciously hosted us on their web site.
In The Entrance Hall, 1996, the impeccably groomed dowager in Barbara Bush-style pearls is poised at the center of a bright turquoise foyer; she smiles graciously yet firmly blocks our access to the room.
Having seen what you have seen this week - Her Majesty graciously signing a Man Utd FC football, Her Majesty graciously doing her shopping in Marks & Spencer, Her Majesty cracking jokes, and so on - you will have realised that entirely new ground is bein g entered, vis-a-vis matters of Royal protocol.
The point is that the confidence of the reader is undermined literally from the very beginning when she graciously thanks a very much alive well-known specialist whom she refers to as deceased.
In the "News and Views" section of the same issue of Nature, Raup graciously acknowledges his error.