good oil


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good oil

Accurate details or information. Primarily heard in Australia. You should start seeing him as trustworthy because he's only given us good oil so far.
See also: good, oil

the good oil

Reliable, trustworthy, and pertinent information. Primarily heard in Australia, Canada. She seems to think you can get the good oil from what other people post on social media.
See also: good, oil

good oil

reliable information. Australian informal
This expression has behind it the image of oil that is used to lubricate a machine and so ensure that it runs well.
See also: good, oil
References in periodicals archive ?
When blended with other products, it reportedly produces good mechanical properties and very good oil resistance.
still a good oil as many continue to die into the 21st century
Not maintaining good oil levels and oil quality will reduce the life of your machine rapidly.
He added: "There is no doubt we have good oil reserves, but one can't be sure how long they will last.
To be Chavez' friend and qualify for good oil deals, the only criterion seems to be that you are against the United States and the free market system.
High-volume global trade in liquefied gas would make this commodity look a lot like oil -- the good oil of today rather than the malign oil of 30 years ago.
Clean containers well so you're not adding good oil to rancid remnants.
The operation, APC, is currently drilling a 18 meter core sample where it reports a good oil and gas show which may be production tested after analyzing the core.
Mr Teeling also told of good oil and gas prices in American in the first half of 2002.
Cox quickly recognised the area had good oil prospects.
Use the first one to get the fouling out and a second treated with a good oil for a final run.
They then bred the bacteria for years in harsh laboratory conditions to select for natural mutations that make the bacteria good oil processors and able to withstand the extreme temperatures and pressures in oil wells.
Frank and Cook admit that "the widening gap between winners and losers is apparently not new," and they quote the British economist Alfred Marshall, writing in 1890: "There never was a time at which moderately good oil paintings sold more cheaply than now, and there never was a time at which first-rate paintings sold so dearly.
It's good oil, too--much like imported crude oil," Taghiei said this week in Chicago at a meeting of the American Chemical Society.