go to the wall


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Related to go to the wall: raring to go

go to the wall

1. To go bankrupt. If the company loses money again this quarter, it will go to the wall sooner than later.
2. To steadfastly support someone or something regardless of any suffering one might incur as a result. I would go to the wall for you, so I'll certainly endorse you on the campaign trail.
3. To yield or submit to someone or something. Despite putting forth our best effort, we went to the wall and came home losers.
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go to the wall (on something)

to take on great risk or to hold out to the very last on some issue. I will go to the wall on this point. This is a very important matter and I will go to the wall if necessary.
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go to the wall

1. Lose a conflict, be defeated; also, yield. For example, In spite of their efforts, they went to the wall, or When it's a matter of family versus friends, friends must go to the wall. [Late 1500s]
2. Fail in business, go bankrupt. For example, First one branch and then another did poorly, and the store finally went to the wall. [First half of 1800s]
3. Take an extreme position, hold out to the end. For example, The President went to the wall to defend his choice to head the FBI. For a synonym, see go to the mat.
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go to the wall

BRITISH
COMMON
1. If a person or company goes to the wall, they lose all their money and their business fails. Over the last year, two football clubs have gone to the wall. A total of 1,776 companies went to the wall in the three months to March.
2. If you are willing to go to the wall for a person or a principle, you support them so strongly that you are prepared to suffer for them. Above all, he prizes loyalty. He'll go to the wall for someone or something he believes in. This man will go to the wall for you if you're on his side. Note: One explanation for this expression is that it refers to someone who is trapped with their back to a wall and no way of escape. Another explanation is that it refers to medieval chapels in which healthy people used to stand, but which had seats around the walls for sick people. A third explanation is that it refers to someone standing in front of a wall before being executed by a firing squad.
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go to the wall

1 (of a business) fail; go out of business. 2 support someone or something, no matter what the cost to yourself. informal
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go to the ˈwall

(informal) fail because of lack of money: Smaller companies are always the first to go to the wall in an economic recession.
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References in periodicals archive ?
If the same rates were replicated in the private sector thousands more businesses would go to the wall every year.
He wants his Drogheda members reimbursed but neither does he want to see the club go to the wall.
It said one in eight country filling stations could go to the wall due to competition from supermarkets and urban garage chains.
Smith leaves the Racecourse after five years in charge, having stuck by the club during 18 months of administration and several boardroom battles which almost saw the Welsh outfit go to the wall.
Just sitting and watching viable businesses go to the wall is not the right approach
The main reason for launching Reds Direct is that we don't want to see the club go to the wall.
They have been forced to lay off staff and now fear they could go to the wall.
The tail has got to stop wagging the dog or more and more businesses will either go to the wall or go to the Far East.
It is feared around 7,000 manufacturers will go to the wall by the end of 2007.