go the whole hog


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go (the) whole hog

To do something in an unrestrained manner. We were only supposed to paint one room this weekend, but we went whole hog and painted three more.
See also: hog, whole

go the whole hog

BRITISH or

go whole hog

AMERICAN
COMMON If someone goes the whole hog, they do something to the fullest extent possible. Note: A hog is a pig. We could be restrained and just have a main course — or go the whole hog and have all three courses. The victim had been identified, and the newspaper continued to go whole hog on the story. Note: This expression may have its origin in butchers asking their customers which part of the pig they wished to buy, or whether they would `go the whole hog' and buy the whole pig. Alternatively, `hog' was a slang term for a ten cent piece in America, and also for an Irish shilling, so the expression may originally have meant `spend the full amount'.
See also: hog, whole

go the whole hog

do something completely or thoroughly. informal
The origin of the phrase is uncertain, but a fable in William Cowper's The Love of the World: Hypocrisy Detected ( 1779 ) is sometimes mentioned: certain Muslims, forbidden to eat pork by their religion but tempted to indulge in some, maintained that Muhammad had had in mind only one particular part of the animal. They could not agree which part that was, and as ‘for one piece they thought it hard From the whole hog to be debarred’ between them they ate the whole animal, each salving his conscience by telling himself that his own particular portion was not the one that had been forbidden. Go the whole hog is recorded as a political expression in the USA in the early 19th century; an 1835 source maintains that it originated in Virginia ‘marking the democrat from a federalist’.
See also: hog, whole

go the ˌwhole ˈhog

(informal) do something thoroughly or completely: They painted the kitchen and then decided to go the whole hog and do the other rooms as well.
See also: hog, whole
References in periodicals archive ?
I'm surprised they didn't just go the whole hog and call the product Traffic Jam.
Everyone kept telling me to have a number one cut but I thought 'If I'm going to do it, I might as well go the whole hog.
Why not go the whole hog and open a superstore on the new shopping park in Llandudno and sell something for every crime.
Why doesn't Cardiff Council go the whole hog and close every school in Cardiff and build a hyperschool on top of Caerphilly mountain where no property developers would wish to build.
Singalong-A-Sound of Music is sure to have the hills alive when it comes to the venue on March 25, with patrons invited to go the whole hog and don a dress made out of curtains or even a nun outfit for the fun proceedings.
We should just go the whole hog and send Devon Malcolm out there to partner Harmy.
Rhona Letley, Why not go the whole hog, and take control of the banks and financial institutions?
After her quickie appearance alongside the Scissor Sisters at this year's festival she's decided to go the whole hog next summer.
NOW that the SFA are going back to the future, tapping Walter Smith for a return as Scotland's team manager, why not go the whole hog and get wee Craig Brown, whose record puts his successors in the shade?
Why not go the whole hog and give Solihull and Telford a namecheck too?
Why not go the whole hog and have a guide or two on hand - free of charge.
Or they may even go the whole hog and call it DTV Airport.
Why not go the whole hog and chain yourself to the wheel of an American jet just before take-off?
And if you want to go the whole hog and become a vice-president - two people have free admission for two days plus two tickets for the president's dinner with a four-course meal, wine and live entertainment, all for pounds 50.
Alternatively you can drop a club while he's about to hit a shot, or go the whole hog and accidentally knock your whole bag over.