go the whole hog


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go (the) whole hog

To do something in an unrestrained manner. We were only supposed to paint one room this weekend, but we went whole hog and painted three more.
See also: hog, whole

go the whole hog

BRITISH or

go whole hog

AMERICAN
COMMON If someone goes the whole hog, they do something to the fullest extent possible. Note: A hog is a pig. We could be restrained and just have a main course — or go the whole hog and have all three courses. The victim had been identified, and the newspaper continued to go whole hog on the story. Note: This expression may have its origin in butchers asking their customers which part of the pig they wished to buy, or whether they would `go the whole hog' and buy the whole pig. Alternatively, `hog' was a slang term for a ten cent piece in America, and also for an Irish shilling, so the expression may originally have meant `spend the full amount'.
See also: hog, whole

go the whole hog

do something completely or thoroughly. informal
The origin of the phrase is uncertain, but a fable in William Cowper's The Love of the World: Hypocrisy Detected ( 1779 ) is sometimes mentioned: certain Muslims, forbidden to eat pork by their religion but tempted to indulge in some, maintained that Muhammad had had in mind only one particular part of the animal. They could not agree which part that was, and as ‘for one piece they thought it hard From the whole hog to be debarred’ between them they ate the whole animal, each salving his conscience by telling himself that his own particular portion was not the one that had been forbidden. Go the whole hog is recorded as a political expression in the USA in the early 19th century; an 1835 source maintains that it originated in Virginia ‘marking the democrat from a federalist’.
See also: hog, whole

go the ˌwhole ˈhog

(informal) do something thoroughly or completely: They painted the kitchen and then decided to go the whole hog and do the other rooms as well.
See also: hog, whole
References in periodicals archive ?
If Coventry council really wants to go into the waste processing business, why not go the whole hog and enter the nuclear waste processing business.
in the highest regard, then why not go the whole hog and pay them accordingly.
But there really is no need to go the whole hog and look like a Los Angeles hooker.
Pity they didn't go the whole hog and rename the brand Anarchy Spreadable.
You might as well go the whole hog and get out of the house - save yourself all that bother.
After drafting the 28-year-old former New Zealand rugby league international into his party, England head coach Brian Ashton could now go the whole hog and hand 'The Volcano' a starting place - just nine games and nine tries into his Gloucester career - against Wales at Twickenham on February 2.
I'm amazed they didn't go the whole hog and give her a moustache like Bronson's too.
Why didn't the all weather track owners go the whole hog and use a pantomime horse?
Motorbike enthusiasts can now go the whole hog and finance their passion with a credit card backed by one of the world's most famous manufacturers.
Of course we could go the whole hog and include a brass band with some cheer leaders hanging around the booth to remind the voter that they are selling themselves to a political ideal.
Why not go the whole hog, put people to sleep with mental illnesses, drug addicts and obese people.
Maybe he'll go the whole hog and suggest compulsory euthanasia for the over-75s - unless they are on a big pension, of course.
I hope if we are going to use it that we go the whole hog and get all the technology available.
If you're going to force us to wear tights and look like ladyboys, we might as well go the whole hog.
It's a good job I don't go the whole hog and wear a pith helmet.