go with

(redirected from go steady with someone)

go with someone

 and go steady with someone
to have a romantic relationship with someone. (Go steady is dated.) Sally has been going with Mark for two months now. He wants to go steady with her. He doesn't want her to see other guys.

go with (someone or something)

to depart in the company of someone or a group. Jim's not here. He went with the last busload. I'm leaving now. Do you want to go with?

go with something

 
1. Lit. to accompany something agreeably. Milk doesn't go with grapefruit. Pink doesn't go with orange.
2. Fig. to choose something (over something else). I think I'll go with the yellow one. We decided to go with the oak table rather than the walnut one.

go with

1. Also, go out with. Accompany; also, date regularly. For example, When I leave, do you want to go with me? or Jerry has been going out with Frieda for two years. [Mid-1500s]
2. Be associated with, as in His accent goes with his background. [c. 1600]
3. Take the side of someone, as in I'll go with you in defending his right to speak freely. [Mid-1400s] Also see go along, def. 2.
4. Also, go well with. Look good with, match. For example, This chair goes well with the rest of the furniture, or That color doesn't go with the curtains. [Early 1700]

go with

v.
1. To proceed in the company of someone or something: I'll go with you to the supermarket if we also stop by the ice cream shop.
2. To select or choose something: We decided to go with the pink wallpaper, even though it doesn't match our carpet.
3. To be matched or suited to something; belong with something: The big lid goes with the stock pot. These shoes will go nicely with my red dress. This wine goes well with spicy food.
4. To be a secondary effect of being something or some way: The risk of injury goes with being a firefighter. I enjoyed being a politician and especially all the privileges that went with it. There are many health problems that go with obesity.
5. To combine with something so that a balanced or harmonious result is achieved. Used chiefly in the infinitive: The museum hosted a series of lectures to go with the art exhibit. I made a sauce to go with the meat.
6. To be in a romantic relationship with someone: Mary started going with Bill after she broke up with her boyfriend.
References in periodicals archive ?
Why go steady with someone in high school unless you're getting married to them?
Even if you do look and act older, you are too young to go steady with someone of 15.