go bust


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Related to go bust: go over

go bust

To experience financial failure or ruin, often as of a business. I'm going to go bust if I have to pay any more medical bills this month! I'm surprised his business went bust—I really thought it was poised for success.
See also: bust

go ˈbust

(informal) (of a business) fail financially; become bankrupt: The firm went bust and fifty workers lost their jobs.
See also: bust

go bust

To go bankrupt.
See also: bust
References in periodicals archive ?
Gareth Alan Davies | scabs dont care for wales just want to feather own nests let regions go bust.
Liverpool managing director Christian Purslow has dismissed fears the club will go bust should the current ownership issues not be successfully resolved.
The collapse of two airlines prompted them to put up a market on the next firm to go bust, which was met by a complaint that the advert denigrated those listed, because it implied they might go into administration.
NEW laws should stop the 'crisis and tragedy' of workers losing their pensions when their firms go bust, the Government said yesterday.
FEWER businesses are set to go bust this year than during 2003 as the UK economic recovery gathers pace, a report claims today.
Thousands of holiday- makers fear that they might lose their trips after claims that MyTravel is about to go bust.
Thousands of workers have seen their employers go bust in the last year and been told their 'defined benefit' pensions will be cut by as much as three quarters.
The Bush administration proposed that countries around the world cut steel subsidies and let companies go bust only weeks after propping up U.
That seemed unfair, considering that most businesses with outside financing are given the three years it typically takes for a business to show a profit or go bust.
But if the bailout plan lacks certainty, it has a trump card that stops its critics dead in their tracks: Without it, Lloyd's would go bust, and the thought of a world without Lloyd's makes many risk managers blanch.
Although it is commonly accepted wisdom that no one could have guessed the Californian power market would be blatantly manipulated, or Enron would go bust leaving trading partners holding the bag, that's not true.
DODGING DIFFICULTIES YOU can't ever guarantee that a firm won't go bust, but here are a few simple tips on how to shop so you've got more rights: | Pay by credit card: You've got lots of statutory protection if you pay for goods or services using a credit card.
This will give you protection if the retailer does go bust - under a law known as section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act 1974 - and you will be entitled to your money back.