go and

go and

This phrase is an intensifier, that is, it heightens the action indicated by the verb that follows it. For example, Don't go and eat all the leftover chicken is stronger than "Don't eat all the leftover chicken." Similarly, Thomas Gray put it in a letter (1760): "But now she has gone ... and married that Monsieur de Wolmar." Sometimes the and is omitted, as in Go tell Dad dinner is ready, or Go fly a kite, colloquial imperatives telling someone to do something. [c. 1300]
See also: and
References in classic literature ?
I'll go and tell Amy," said Meg, feeling a little hurt, yet rather relieved on the whole, for she did not like nursing, and Jo did.
At twelve o'clock at night the princess goes to the bathing-house: go up to her and give her a kiss, and she will let you lead her away; but take care you do not suffer her to go and take leave of her father and mother.
Yes, I 'll get two tickets as cheap as I can, send a note to Will, poor lad, he needs fun as much as I do, and we 'll go and have a nice time in some corner, as Charles Lamb and his sister used to.
I think I must be a little crazy to-night," said Polly, gathering up her rescued finery and preparing to go and find Fan.
Then the Crab said to the old fisherman, 'Now take this rod; go and knock with it on a certain mountain; then a black man[6] will come out and ask you what you wish for.
Here and there you go and there is no one to boss you.
And behold, they were glad they had gone into savagery, for they had gained something; they found that they could now smoke a little without having to go and hunt for a lost knife; they did not get sick enough to be seriously uncomfortable.
I'll go and have another look," said Marilla, determining to be just.
Now, don't you go and be a fool like some of these town boys.
You go and ring it every half-hour and then you know what time it is.
Come, you'll be dull alone, so go and stay at Moscow a little.
It was 'lection day, and I was just about to go and vote myself if I warn't too drunk to get there; but when they told me there was a State in this country where they'd let that nigger vote, I drawed out.
The Englishman answered, "The island was theirs; the governor had given it to them, and no man had anything to do there but themselves;" and with that he swore that he would go and burn all their new huts; they should build none upon their land.
Never mind where he is, let you and I go and see what is to be done for our poor friends.
Pontellier go and sit with them over at the house till Mr.