go about

(redirected from go about one's business)

go about

 and go around 
1. [for a rumor] to go from person to person. What is this story about you that I hear going about? There was a nasty rumor about Gerald going around.
2. [for a disease] to spread. There is a lot of this flu going about these days. There is a bad cough going around.
3. Go to go around someone or something.

go about something

to approach the doing of something in a particular way. How should I go about researching this topic? Would you tell me how to go about it?

go about something/doing something

to do something We'd like to help but we're not sure how to go about it. How do you go about getting a visa?
Related vocabulary: go about your business

go about

1. Also, go around. Move here and there, to and fro; also, circulate. For example, She's been going about telling everyone the news, or A report went around that the dollar was dropping. [c. 1300]
2. Set about, undertake, as in I'm not sure how to go about making a pie. [Late 1600s]
3. go about one's business. Proceed with one's own proper occupation or concern. For example, Don't bother with that-just go about your business. [Late 1600s]

go about

v.
1. To go from place to place in some area, doing something openly and habitually: All summer, the bees go about the garden collecting pollen.
2. To execute some routine: From my office on the top floor, I could observe all the city's workers going about their business.
3. To walk around or appear in public, especially in a particular state of dress: I don't know why you always go about in that silly hat.
4. To undertake something in a particular way: How does one go about finding an apartment? Your application could take weeks if you don't go about it in the right way.
References in periodicals archive ?
Andrew Miller, Labour committee chairman, said: "Despite the increasing use of malware, the internet is still a reasonably safe place to go about one's business, provided users take a few sensible precautions.
Of course, the right to protest is an integral part of our constitution, but so is the right to go about one's business without the interference of a man in a tractor or a Batman suit.