glory

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Related to gloried: glorified, holding back, took over

glory hole

vulgar slang A hole in a bathroom stall through which anonymous sexual acts take place.
See also: glory, hole

go to (one's) glory

euphemism To die. I'm so sorry to be the one to tell you this, but Grandma went to her glory this morning.
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no guts, no glory

Success does not come without the courage to take risks. I was certainly nervous to start playing again after such a bad injury, but no guts, no glory, right?
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Glory be!

Inf. an exclamation expressing surprise or shock. (A bit old-fashioned.) Mary: Glory be! Is that what I think it is? Sue: Well, it'sakitten, if that's what you thought. Sally: First a car just missed hitting her, then she fell down on the ice. Mary: Glory be!
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glory in something

Fig. to take great pleasure in something; to revel in something. He just glories in all the attention he is getting. Martha tends to glory in doing things just exactly right.
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in one's glory

Fig. at one's happiest or best. When I go to the beach on vacation, I'm in my glory. Sally is a good teacher. She's in her glory in the classroom.
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send someone to glory

 
1. Fig. to kill someone. One shot sent him to glory. You want me to send you to glory or something?
2. Fig. to officiate at the burial services for someone. The preacher sent him to glory amidst the sobs of his relatives. The preacher probably gets fifty bucks for every stiff he sends to glory.
See also: glory, send

glory in something

to be very pleased or proud about something Her parents gloried in her success as an artist.
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in (all) somebody's/something's glory

in a very happy, successful, or beautiful state When he dropped out of the race, his opponents were in their glory. The garden in all its glory is now open to the public.
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the glory days (of something)

a time in the past when something was very successful The pace of American dance music has slowed considerably since the glory days of disco.
Usage notes: sometimes also used in the form someone's glory days: The song is a joyous nod to the group's glory days.
See also: days, glory

somebody's/something's glory days

a time in the past when someone or something was very successful The book focusses on the glory days of the jazz scene in the early 1940's and 1950's.
See also: days, glory

in one's glory

At one's best, happiest, or most gratified. For example, She was in her glory playing her first big solo, or In the classroom, this teacher's in his glory. [c. 1800] Also see in one's element.
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glory in

v.
To take great pleasure or pride in something; revel in something: The composer gloried in the beauty of his own compositions.
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morning glory

and morning missile
n. a morning erection. Always happy to see the morning glory. Bobby has a morning missile instead of an alarm clock.
See also: glory, morning

send someone to glory

1. tv. to kill someone. One shot sent him to glory.
2. tv. to officiate at the burial services for someone. The preacher sent him to glory amidst the sobs of six or seven former fans.
See also: glory, send
References in classic literature ?
Anne evidently got through her visit without any serious breach of "etiquette," for she came home through the twilight, under a great, high-sprung sky gloried over with trails of saffron and rosy cloud, in a beatified state of mind and told Marilla all about it happily, sitting on the big red-sandstone slab at the kitchen door with her tired curly head in Marilla's gingham lap.
His wife was a "hustler," who gloried in hustling; his family got a comfortable living off the farm; and his strapping sons and daughters, inheriting their mother's energy, were all in a fair way to do well in the world.
By 1652 it had resulted in the loss of Milton's eyesight, previously over-strained by his studies--a sacrifice in which he gloried but which lovers of poetry must always regret, especially since the controversy largely consisted, according to the custom of the time, in a disgusting exchange of personal scurrilities.
And then he led away the talk to their home in Devonshire, and the red, bright earth, and the deep green combes, and the peat streams like cairngorm pebbles, and the wild moor with its high, cloudy tors for a giant background to the picture, till Tom got jealous, and stood up for the clear chalk streams, and the emerald water meadows and great elms and willows of the dear old royal county, as he gloried to call it.
He could have endured poverty, and while this distress had been the meed of his virtue, he gloried in it; but the ingratitude of the Turk and the loss of his beloved Safie were misfortunes more bitter and irreparable.
Notwithstanding these slight defects, John perfectly gloried in the animal; and when she was brought round to the door by Hugh, actually retired into the bar, and there, in a secret grove of lemons, laughed with pride.