glop

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glop

(glɑp)
1. n. unappetizing food; gunk; anything undesirable. Do we have the same old glop again tonight?
2. tv. to slop or plop something (onto something). She glopped something horrible onto my plate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Residents of Toledo, Ohio are getting their water back, but the algal blooms that turned the waters of Lake Erie into something resembling gloppy green paint are a long-term problem that will require major changes in farming and sewage treatment throughout the Midwest.
The collages include small black-and-white photographs of archaeological digs, and his big bronze--a gloppy mass of gouges, pours, and submerged half shapes, sandblasted to a sparkly gold and scarred with iridescent welds--is titled EXCAVATOR DIG SITE, 2010.
The pan-fried cabbage and pork dumplings had rather workmanlike outer jackets and the fruity spareribs were okay but gloppy, thermonuclear in temperature.
I know this because on the way to making good pasta salads, I've made a few gloppy messes and others that were glop-free but dull.
But the pair never left the studio backlot, which makes their global jaunt feel as fake as the gloppy sentiment in rookie screenwriter Justin Zackham's script.
That's right--don't just drench your live targets, blast them, with gobs of gloppy Bio-Ooze, a whole lot of yuck that is sure to leave a lasting impression.
make a New England clam chowder that is not that gloppy, thick,
Instead of the gloppy, wet "graupel-type" flakes that usually tumble out of Western Oregon skies, these were delicately filigreed crystals of the kind you probably imagined as a kid, then crafted with scissors and typing paper in hand.
As you clean up the gloppy mess that's left of your experiment, you might be thinking of going for extra credit.
The fish and chips ($16) our friend ordered was clearly over-fried, and surrounded by a gloppy mass of fries.
With their gloppy facture and attached detritus--here magazine clippings and underwear, there scrap lumber and snarls of audio tape--Sir Henry Francis Taylor, 1961, and One Window Is Clear--Notes to Lou Andreas Salome, 1965, both forcefully summon Rauschenberg, though he might not have lionized the Victorian scientist photographed by Julia Margaret Cameron, or the psychoanalyst-writer who befriended Nietzsche.
Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits -- Elissa Wall, a 39-year-old volunteer excavator from Winnetka, clears away gloppy black sediment from a knot of saber-tooth cat bones that poke through the molasses ground.
The soupy, gloppy food enters the next part of the tube, the small intestine, all twenty feet of it coiled up inside you like a hose pipe.
Chewed gum hardens into a gloppy mess that sticks to and stains everything.