glad

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glad tidings

Favorable, beneficial, or happy news. Usually used with the verbs "give" or "bring." The union leader brought glad tidings to the striking workers that their demands for pay increases had been accepted by the company's management.
See also: glad

be glad to see the back of (someone)

Be glad to see someone leave (usually because the speaker dislikes the person). Ed has been driving me nuts with requests, so I'll be glad to see the back of him when the construction is done on his office.
See also: back, glad, of, see

Am I glad to see you!

I am very glad to see you! (Not a question. There is a stress on I and another on you.) Bill: Well, I finally got here! John: Wow! Am I glad to see you! Tom (as Bill opens the door): Here I am, Bill. What's wrong? Bill: Boy, am I glad to see you! I need your help right now.
See also: glad, see

*glad hand

Fig. an overly friendly welcome; a symbol of insincere attention. (*Typically: get ~; give someone ∼.) Whenever I go into that store, I get the glad hand. I hate to go to a party and get the glad hand.
See also: glad, hand

(I'm) glad to hear it.

a phrase expressing pleasure at what the speaker has just said. Sally: We have a new car, finally. Mary: I'm glad to hear it. Tom: Is your sister feeling better? Bill: Oh, yes, thanks. Tom: Glad to hear it.
See also: glad, hear

(I'm) glad you could come.

 and (We're) glad you could come,
a phrase said by the host or hostess [or both] to a guest. Tom: Thank you so much for having me. Sally: We're glad you could come. John: Yes, we are. Bye. Bill: Bye. Sally: Bye, Bill. Glad you could come.
See also: come, could, glad

(I'm) glad you could drop by.

 and (We're) glad you could drop by.; (I'm) glad you could stop by.; (We're) glad you could stop by.
a phrase said by the host or hostess (or both) to a guest who has appeared suddenly or has come for only a short visit. Tom: Good—bye. Had a nice time. Mary: Thank you for coming, Tom. Glad you could drop by. Tom: Thank you so much for having me. Sally: We're glad you could drop by.
See also: could, drop, glad

(I'm) (very) glad to meet you.

a polite expression said to a person to whom one has just been introduced. (See also (I'm) pleased to meet you.) Mary: I'd like you to meet my brother, Tom. Bill: I'm very glad to meet you, Tom. Jane: Hi! I'm Jane. Bob: Glad to meet you. I'm Bob.
See also: glad, meet

give somebody the glad eye

  (British & Australian old-fashioned)
to look at someone in a way that makes it obvious that you are sexually attracted to them I think you have an admirer. That man in the corner is giving you the glad eye.
See also: eye, give, glad

your glad rags

  (old-fashioned)
the clothes that you wear when you are going somewhere special Put your glad rags on, we're going to a party.
See also: glad, rag

be [glad/happy/pleased etc.] to see the back of somebody/something

to be pleased when someone leaves or when something ends because you did not like them She was an absolute pain when she stayed with us and we were both really pleased to see the back of her. I'll be glad to see the back of this thesis. It's been going on far too long.
See also: back, of, see

give someone the once-over

Also, give someone the eye. Look or stare at someone with interest. For example, The new coach gave the team the once-over before introducing himself, or He gave her the eye and she blushed. The first expression, a colloquialism, generally implies a quick but comprehensive survey or assessment. The variant, a slangy usage sometimes amplified to give the glad eye, often signifies an inviting glance. [Early 1900s] Also see make eyes at.
See also: give

glad hand

A warm and hearty but often insincere welcome or greeting, as in Politicians are apt to give the glad hand to one and all. [Slang; late 1800s]
See also: glad, hand

glad rags

Stylish clothes, as in Let's put on our glad rags and go out on the town. [Slang; late 1800s]
See also: glad, rag

glad

mod. alcohol intoxicated. After a few beers she was a mite glad.

glad rags

n. fancy clothes; best clothing. (see also rag.) I’ll get on my glad rags, and we’ll go out tonight.
See also: glad, rag

glad-hand

tv. to greet someone effusively. (The hand is the hand that is offered to quickly to each person who is greeted.) The senator was glad-handing everyone in sight.

glad-hander

n. someone who displays effusive friendship, typically a politician. (See comment at glad-hand.) The glad-handers were out in full force at the Independence Day parade.
References in periodicals archive ?
A STRONG CONTENDER Due Diligence makes his seasonal bow at the Curragh today in the Big Bad Bob Gladness
Get a pint or three of Gladness down your screech and you'll know what you're on about.
The service ended with the traditional singing of Harvest Gladness - also known as The Drop.
It is a big day for gladness at the Sober Valley Lodge because now I can take all of the bazillions, never have to look at [Chuck Lorre] again and I never have to put on those silly shirts for as long as this warlock exists in his terrestrial dimension.
As a hymn puts it: "Let us sing of Easter gladness that rejoices every day,Sing of hope and faith uplifted; Love has rolled the stone away".
LARRY LYNX on Irish turf DERMOT WELD'S Mad About You can bounce back to top form in the Gladness Stakes at The Curragh today.
a now that it's gone, a gotta forget, a one-day gladness and the
Return unto thy Lord with (in) gladness that is thine in Him and His in thee.
This gladness is shared with the disciples and transforms their grief and brings them to the point of being a renewed community.
And then we must seek to be the one who consoles, who soothes and brings balm and the oil of healing and gladness to others.
He went on, 'There is a time for sadness and a time for gladness.
A gladness that they belonged to us - a gladness that they are at peace.
To rest in the Lord and to see his joy is like a banquet, and full of gladness and tranquillity.
As they walked away, I felt a tightness in my throat: salt, the sea air, grief, and gladness together.
Jake, newly returned from America, has performance aspirations and a low threshold for suffering fools with anything approaching gladness.