glad

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glad tidings

Favorable, beneficial, or happy news. Usually used with the verbs "give" or "bring." The union leader brought glad tidings to the striking workers that their demands for pay increases had been accepted by the company's management.
See also: glad

be glad to see the back of (someone)

Be glad to see someone leave (usually because the speaker dislikes the person). Ed has been driving me nuts with requests, so I'll be glad to see the back of him when the construction is done on his office.
See also: back, glad, of, see

(boy,) am I glad to see you!

Said when one is happy or relieved by another person's arrival. Boy, am I glad to see you! Can you please help me with the kids? Am I glad to see you! I can't believe my car died tonight—thank you so much for coming to get me.
See also: glad, see

Am I glad to see you!

I am very glad to see you! (Not a question. There is a stress on I and another on you.) Bill: Well, I finally got here! John: Wow! Am I glad to see you! Tom (as Bill opens the door): Here I am, Bill. What's wrong? Bill: Boy, am I glad to see you! I need your help right now.
See also: glad, see

*glad hand

Fig. an overly friendly welcome; a symbol of insincere attention. (*Typically: get ~; give someone ∼.) Whenever I go into that store, I get the glad hand. I hate to go to a party and get the glad hand.
See also: glad, hand

(I'm) glad to hear it.

a phrase expressing pleasure at what the speaker has just said. Sally: We have a new car, finally. Mary: I'm glad to hear it. Tom: Is your sister feeling better? Bill: Oh, yes, thanks. Tom: Glad to hear it.
See also: glad, hear

(I'm) glad you could come.

 and (We're) glad you could come,
a phrase said by the host or hostess [or both] to a guest. Tom: Thank you so much for having me. Sally: We're glad you could come. John: Yes, we are. Bye. Bill: Bye. Sally: Bye, Bill. Glad you could come.
See also: come, could, glad

(I'm) glad you could drop by.

 and (We're) glad you could drop by.; (I'm) glad you could stop by.; (We're) glad you could stop by.
a phrase said by the host or hostess (or both) to a guest who has appeared suddenly or has come for only a short visit. Tom: Good—bye. Had a nice time. Mary: Thank you for coming, Tom. Glad you could drop by. Tom: Thank you so much for having me. Sally: We're glad you could drop by.
See also: could, drop, glad

(I'm) (very) glad to meet you.

a polite expression said to a person to whom one has just been introduced. (See also (I'm) pleased to meet you.) Mary: I'd like you to meet my brother, Tom. Bill: I'm very glad to meet you, Tom. Jane: Hi! I'm Jane. Bob: Glad to meet you. I'm Bob.
See also: glad, meet

give someone the once-over

Also, give someone the eye. Look or stare at someone with interest. For example, The new coach gave the team the once-over before introducing himself, or He gave her the eye and she blushed. The first expression, a colloquialism, generally implies a quick but comprehensive survey or assessment. The variant, a slangy usage sometimes amplified to give the glad eye, often signifies an inviting glance. [Early 1900s] Also see make eyes at.
See also: give

glad hand

A warm and hearty but often insincere welcome or greeting, as in Politicians are apt to give the glad hand to one and all. [Slang; late 1800s]
See also: glad, hand

glad rags

Stylish clothes, as in Let's put on our glad rags and go out on the town. [Slang; late 1800s]
See also: glad, rag

be glad to see the back of someone or something

mainly BRITISH
COMMON If you are glad to see the back of someone or something, you are pleased that they have gone. Nick said last night that Carter was an awful man. He added: `We are glad to see the back of him.' Note: Adjectives such as pleased or happy are sometimes used instead of glad. Most politicians will be as pleased to see the back of him as the voters.
See also: back, glad, of, see, something

glad

mod. alcohol intoxicated. After a few beers she was a mite glad.

glad rags

n. fancy clothes; best clothing. (see also rag.) I’ll get on my glad rags, and we’ll go out tonight.
See also: glad, rag

glad-hand

tv. to greet someone effusively. (The hand is the hand that is offered to quickly to each person who is greeted.) The senator was glad-handing everyone in sight.

glad-hander

n. someone who displays effusive friendship, typically a politician. (See comment at glad-hand.) The glad-handers were out in full force at the Independence Day parade.
References in classic literature ?
I will never break another flower," cried Eva; " but let me go to them, dear Fairy; I would gladly know the lovely spirits, and ask forgiveness for the sorrow I have caused.
They clung about her tenderly, and little Rose-Leaf placed a flower crown on her head, whispering softly, "When you would come to us again, stand by the brook-side and wave this in the air, and we will gladly take you to our home again.
Cadj, the High Priest," he announced, "would sacrifice you both to the Flaming God; but all of us except Cadj would gladly return to Opar with our queen.
She invited me at last to come, and be at her house till I could find something to do, and it should cost me very little, and this I gladly accepted of.
According to Tim Burke, partner of Electronic Art LLC, many kiosk vendors will gladly sell hardware to companies without knowing if it is the right solution for the software being used, or for the business model.
Kavanagh, 34, told Judge Paul Carney: "If I could get the death penalty, I would gladly take it.
And don't think you have to venture to an exotic land to satisfy us; we'll also gladly welcome photos of the Old Point Loma Lighthouse in San Diego or the mist-shrouded meadows of the Yosemite Valley.
In exchange for her soul, Lucy, who happens to be the devil, offers fame and fortune, which V gladly accepts thinking what the hell is a soul - that's later in life, make that death.
Miss Rhiannon said she gladly gives lectures for police about her eight-day ordeal, which included being kept in a coffin inside a wheelie bin.
Readers of THE NEW AMERICAN will gladly receive his point that hospital administrators and social workers were wrong in judging preemie William Goforth to be unworthy of the costs involved in keeping him alive.
How gladly would we unsay something we said a few moments ago, how thankful we would be if we could wipe out the discussion.
Estrada gladly took the booking and one Pride led to others.
Laura's manner is brusque; she does not gladly suffer fools or excuse-makers.
We will gladly provide a free inspection and report on the progress of your indoor asthma garden.
In a sense, he is like a cultural semi-otician drunk with narcissism, gladly seduced by the power of reason to remap the world in relation to the rules of the unconscious, but aware that all of this is only a fiction set loose by a new mythological iconography, one that is deceptively accessible but mischievously unutilitarian.