given


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a given

Something that can be assumed or relied upon. My vote isn't a given, you know—you still need to prove to me that you can handle this job.
See also: given

given

1. Designated. If you're not here at the given time tomorrow, the bus is going to leave without you!
2. Considering. Given the rainy weather, we had to cancel the picnic.
See:
References in classic literature ?
Ulysses answered, "I see that you are of an unbelieving mind; I have given you my oath, and yet you will not credit me; let us then make a bargain, and call all the gods in heaven to witness it.
Eliot gave them occasionally an apple or a cake; and the adults were requested to repeat to them the instructions that had been given.
A great loss to me at any rate,' answered the Miller; 'why, I had as good as given him my wheelbarrow, and now I really don't know what to do with it.
As an example of this, there are two ladies in New York, whose names rarely appear in print, but who, in a quiet way, have given us the means with which to erect three large and important buildings during the last eight years.
I can hardly imagine any occurrence which could have given me more genuine satisfaction than the receipt of this draft.
O my soul, I have given thee everything, and all my hands have become empty by thee:--and now
O my soul, now have I given thee all, and even my last possession, and all my hands have become empty by thee:--THAT I BADE THEE SING, behold, that was my last thing to give!
A physical law does not say "A will be followed by B," but tells us what acceleration a particle will have under given circumstances, i.
It is generally assumed that, given any event, there is some one phenomenon which is THE cause of the event in question.
1) All the appearances of different stars in a given place, or,
Not a single merchant ever buys a forest without counting the trees, unless they get it given them for nothing, as you're doing now.
The repentance of her lover at the Bath, and how brought by the just alarm of his fit of sickness to abandon her; the just caution given there against even the lawful intimacies of the dearest friends, and how unable they are to preserve the most solemn resolutions of virtue without divine assistance; these are parts which, to a just discernment, will appear to have more real beauty in them all the amorous chain of story which introduces it.
Our surgeon charged the men to cause the meat to be boiled while they stayed, and to keep guard in the cook-room, to prevent the men taking it to eat raw, or taking it out of the pot before it was well boiled, and then to give every man but a very little at a time: and by this caution he preserved the men, who would otherwise have killed themselves with that very food that was given them on purpose to save their lives.
At the same time I ordered the mate to go into the great cabin, and see what condition the poor passengers were in; and if they were alive, to comfort them, and give them what refreshment was proper: and the surgeon gave him a large pitcher, with some of the prepared broth which he had given the mate that was on board, and which he did not question would restore them gradually.
However, as their captain begged of us to help him to set up a main-topmast, and a kind of a topmast to his jury fore-mast, we did, as it were, lie by him for three or four days; and then, having given him five barrels of beef, a barrel of pork, two hogsheads of biscuit, and a proportion of peas, flour, and what other things we could spare; and taking three casks of sugar, some rum, and some pieces of eight from them for satisfaction, we left them, taking on board with us, at their own earnest request, the youth and the maid, and all their goods.