give lip service to

give/pay lip service to something

to say that you agree with and support an idea or plan but not do anything to help it to succeed The company pays lip service to the notion of racial equality but you look around you and all you see are white faces.
See curl lip
See also: give, lip, service
References in periodicals archive ?
Often, marketers and others give lip service to privacy but in reality are threatened by tools that deliver meaningful privacy.
Although many advance care planning proponents give lip service to honoring individual preferences, in practice its pervasive focus is to 'nudge' patients to agree to forego life-saving treatment and even assisted feeding through the use of unbalanced, distorted, and even inaccurate information.
policymakers give lip service to America's own debt problem.
We give lip service to the idea of boycotts, divestment and sanctions, yet we fail to make this important tool work as we argue over petty internal issues.
The international community's credibility is on the line because we give lip service to the notion that these international norms are important.
And America and Congress's credibility is on the line because we give lip service to the notion that these international norms are important.
The international community's credibility is on the line, and America and Congress's credibility is on the line, if we give lip service to the idea that these norms are important.
America and Congress' credibility is on the line because we give lip service to the notion these international norms are important.
America and Congress' credibility is on the line, because we give lip service to the notion that these international norms are important.
The whole international community credibility is, and America and the Congress is on the line because we give lip service to the notion that these international norms are important.
Don't just give lip service to "client's best interests.
A government of national unity, backed by the army, that would give lip service to democratic institutions would be just fine.
Unlike Mr Brown and his Government, many of whom have no armed services experience and merely give lip service to the predicament of military injuries while standing before the Cenotaph hypocritically clutching a wreath on Remembrance Sundays with the Royal family, generals and heads of the services, these people risked their lives for their country and are now suffering service injuries too young to know their significance to future health problems.
Maehara probably did not merely give lip service to Morita but rather prepared the way for serious discussions about unified management of Narita and Haneda, routes and access to the airports.
While I understand that you have to give lip service to whatever "touchy-feely" topic happens to be in vogue at the moment, I really do think you'd better serve your readers by sticking to stories that deal with the Army's primary task--keeping this country safe.