give in


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give in

1. To collapse, crumble, or cave in. We were able to get the kids out of the house before the roof gave in.
2. To submit, concede, or yield (to someone or something); to surrender or acknowledge defeat. The king is foolish if he believes our rebellion will ever give in! Under the threat of a strike, the management gave in and agreed to reinstate annual pay increases for all employees.
3. To hand in, deliver, or submit (something). Primarily heard in UK. Please give in your report by the end of the day.
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give in

cave in; to push in. The rotting door gave in when we pushed, and we went inside. The wall gave in where I kicked it.
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give in (to someone or something)

to yield to someone or something; to give up to someone or something. He argued and argued and finally gave in to my demands. I thought he'd never give in.
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give in (to somebody/something)

to agree to something after originally opposing it cave in (to somebody/something) Brown shrugged his shoulders and gave in, surrendering to the police without a word. For a second she was tempted to give in to their whining, then thought they should learn how to wait - quietly.
Related vocabulary: knuckle under (to somebody/something)
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give in

1. Hand in, submit, as in She gave in her report today. [Early 1600s]
2. Relent, cease opposition, yield, as in I'll give in on this point, or You can have the car-I give in to your arguments. [Early 1600s]
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give in

v.
1. To submit something; hand in something: She gave in her report. You can't change the grades after you've given them in, so make sure they are correct.
2. To cease opposition; yield: They will try to make you change your mind, but don't give in. The opposition finally gave in to our demands.
3. To give way; collapse: The floor gave in under the weight of the heavy sculpture.
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