gilding


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Related to gilding: gilding metal, gilding the lily

gild the pill

To make something unpleasant seem appealing. I knew that my daughter was not going to be happy to go the doctor, so I gilded the pill by reminding her about all the toys that are in the office.
See also: gild, pill

gild the lily

To further adorn something that is already beautiful. You look radiant, as always—wearing such an extravagant gown is just gilding the lily.
See also: gild, lily

gild the lily

Fig. to add ornament or decoration to something that is pleasing in its original state; to attempt to improve something that is already fine the way it is. (Often refers to flattery or exaggeration.) Your house has lovely brickwork. Don't paint it. That would be gilding the lily. Oh, Sally. You're beautiful the way you are. You don't need makeup. You would be gilding the lily.
See also: gild, lily

gild the lily

Add unnecessary adornment or supposed improvement. For example, Offering three different desserts after that elaborate meal would be gilding the lily. This expression is a condensation of Shakespeare's metaphor in King John (4:2): "To gild refined gold, to paint the lily ... is wasteful and ridiculous excess." [c. 1800]
See also: gild, lily

gild the lily

If someone gilds the lily, they try to improve something which is already very good, and so what they are doing is unnecessary. There can be a temptation to gild the lily in such documents, making exaggerated claims about what the school can offer to students. Top the cake with ice cream or whipped cream, if you're keen on gilding the lily. Note: This expression may be based on lines in Shakespeare's `King John' (1595): `To gild refined gold, to paint the lily... Is wasteful and ridiculous excess.' (Act 4, Scene 2)
See also: gild, lily

gild the lily

try to improve what is already beautiful or excellent.
This phrase adapts lines from Shakespeare's King John: ‘To gild refined gold, to paint the lily…Is wasteful and ridiculous excess’.
See also: gild, lily

gild the ˈlily

try to improve something which is already perfect, and so spoil it: The dress is perfect. Don’t add anything to it at all. It would just be gilding the lily.This comes from Shakespeare’s play King John. Gild means ‘to cover something with a thin layer of gold’. A lily is a very beautiful flower.
See also: gild, lily

gild the lily

1. To adorn unnecessarily something already beautiful.
2. To make superfluous additions to what is already complete.
See also: gild, lily

gild the lily

Engage in an unnecessary and usually wasteful activity. Like carrying coals to Newcastle, to gild a lily would be a waste of time as the flower already possesses more than sufficient beauty. The phrase comes from a misquotation of lines from Shakespeare's King John: Therefore, to be possess'd with double pomp, To guard a title that was rich before, To gild refined gold, to paint the lily . . . Is wasteful and ridiculous excess.
See also: gild, lily
References in periodicals archive ?
Such a mobilization might be hard to conceive of right now--what with the elites dithering within a virulent wave of asinine ideological bullshit--but Gilding thinks that, soon, we're going to wake in a sweat, shrug off the denial, and get to work.
Our backs will be against the wall," Gilding writes, "and in that situation we have proved ourselves to be extraordinary.
With unintended irony (he doesn't seem aware of the phrase's established religious connotations), Gilding speaks of a coming "great awakening.
For their part Moseley are adamant they needed tighthead Gilding and point to the fact Sigley was unfit and when he did come on against Titans and that he lasted just a few minutes before being withdrawn again.
Gilding then walked over into the rowdy group after Mr Parkin was seen to punch the woman in the face.
Prosecutor Caroline Goodwin stressed Gilding was not part of the "despicable acts" that followed the punch.
Gilding, of High Street, Redcar, denied manslaughter and was yesterday cleared of this.
And ASDA has assembled all of these ingredients in a handy gilding glaze pot costing just pounds 1.
Gold- and silver-gilded objects such as furniture, wall carvings, plaster moldings, mirror frames, and candlesticks were originally used in churches and palaces to evoke admiration from the masses but then became the desired chattels of the more prosperous members of society, as gilding workshops flourished.
Today, the ancient craft of gilding is still taught at Parsons School of Design in New York City.
Gilding served as investment officer for the United Mine Workers of America Health & Welfare Funds.
Gilding serves as a member of the Board of Directors of the Robert Toigo Foundation and the ICMA Vantage Point Funds, serves on the Advisory Board for Pensions 2000, and is a member of the NYSE Pension Managers Advisory Committee.
Ecologist Paul Gilding expresses hope in The Great Disruption that, as the depth of the climate crisis hits, the world will in like fashion launch into wartime-like mobilization to avert ecological and socioeconomic catastrophe.
Resource depletion and altered climate patterns will universally wreck economies, threaten public health, and spark violent social tensions, Gilding argues.
The Elkington brothers' inventionsThe Elkington brothers were originally gilt toy makers, but in 1836 George Richards Elkington invented gilding by dipping items in a solution of gold in water, bicarbonate and potassium.