get

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get

 on
1. to get along; to thrive. Well, how are you two getting on? We are getting on okay.
2. Go to get on something and get on (with someone).

get something

 and get it 
1. to receive punishment. Bill broke the window, and he's really going to get it. John got it for arriving late at school.
2. to receive the meaning of a joke; to understand a joke. John told a joke, but I didn't get it. Bob laughed very hard, but Mary didn't get it.

get something (for an amount of money)

to buy something for a certain amount of money. I got my car for only $1500. She got her dinner for a song.

get

/have the best of
To outdo or outwit; defeat: My opponent got the best of me in the debate.

get

/have the better of
To outdo or outwit; defeat.

get

/have the drop on
To achieve a distinct advantage over.

get

/lay (one's) hands on
To get possession of; acquire or obtain.

get

/have (someone's) number
To determine or know someone's real character or motives.

get

/sink (one's) teeth into Slang
To be actively involved in; get a firm grasp of.

get

/put it all together Slang
To unify and harmonize one's resources so as to perform with maximal effectiveness.

get

/have the worst of it
To suffer a defeat or disadvantage.
See:
References in classic literature ?
So Jurgis thought, and so he spoke, in his bold, free way; very much to his surprise, he found that it had a tendency to get him into trouble.
It will get out among my boys, and it will not be a particularly quiet business getting away any of my fellows, if they know it, I'll promise you.
She'll get tired of Jerry, and go off and marry a soldier, and we'll live happy ever after.
Michael had managed to get up on his three legs and was striving to stumble forward against the restraining arms of Sara.
But as soon as he found that the Peacock arrangement would get him to Rugby by twelve o'clock in the day, whereas otherwise he wouldn't be there till the evening, all other plans melted away, his one absorbing aim being to become a public school-boy as fast as possible, and six hours sooner or later seeming to him of the most alarming importance.
At first he meant to repaper the room, but afterwards he said that I was letting it get the better of me, and that nothing was worse for a nervous patient than to give way to such fancies.
White men have been known to encourage slaves to escape, and then, to get the reward, catch them and return them to their masters.
With such a cargo on board, digestion is a slow process, and we must sit long in the cool chambers and smoke--and read French newspapers, which have a strange fashion of telling a perfectly straight story till you get to the "nub" of it, and then a word drops in that no man can translate, and that story is ruined.
What you want to do is get behind my tomfool words and get a feel of the man that's behind them.
I am rather afraid that Doctor Softly was not a clever medical man; for in spite of his great connections, he did not get a very magnificent practice as a physician.
The greatest ass in the medical profession (he informed me) has just been made a baronet; and his admiring friends have decided that he is to be painted at full length, with his bandy legs hidden under a gown, and his great globular eyes staring at the spectator--I'll get you the job.
Steve looks as fierce as a game-cock; but don't you get excited, my son, for it won't do a bit of good.
A body can get used to anything, even to being hanged, as the Irishman said.
Now I feel as if I had to get out on the rocks or the fields or the water and spout them.
But she didn't get on very fast, as she was talking all the time, sometimes to the kitten, and sometimes to herself.