get a bang out of

get a bang out of

Also get a charge or kick out of . Get a feeling of excitement from, get a thrill from. For example, I get a bang out of taking the kids to the amusement park, or I get a charge out of her imitations. The first two terms allude to the jolt of an electrical charge. The first dates from the 1920s; Damon Runyon had it in Guys and Dolls (1929): "He seems to be getting a great bang out of the doings." The second dates from the mid-1900s. The third probably alludes to the stimulating effect of a strong alcoholic drink- kick was used in this sense from the 1840s on-but the precise wording dates from the early 1900s. Cole Porter used it for one of his most popular songs, "I Get A Kick Out of You" (1934).
See also: bang, get, of, out