gentleman

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a scholar and a gentleman

Someone (usually a male, due to the gender implication of "gentleman") who is admirable or of high esteem. Although used sincerely as a compliment, it is generally bombastic and lighthearted in nature. Thank you for helping me move into the new house, you are truly a scholar and a gentleman.
See also: and, gentleman, scholar

a gentleman and a scholar

Someone (usually a male, due to the gender implication of "gentleman") who is admirable or of high esteem. Although used sincerely as a compliment, it is generally bombastic and lighthearted in nature. Thank you for helping me move into the new house, you are truly a scholar and a gentleman.
See also: and, gentleman, scholar

gentleman's agreement

A legally non-binding arrangement that is guaranteed only by a verbal or mutually understood agreement by the parties involved. Though my father left me his entire estate in his will, I made a gentleman's agreement with my brother to share the wealth equally between us.
See also: agreement

gentleman's pact

A legally non-binding arrangement that is guaranteed only by a verbal or mutually understood agreement by the parties involved. Though my father left me his entire estate in his will, I made a gentleman's pact with my brother to share the wealth equally between us.

gentleman of the four outs

An upstart. The four "outs" in question (that the person is living without) are manners, money, credit, and wit. I can't stand the young new partner at the firm—I can see that he's a gentleman of the four outs.
See also: four, gentleman, of, out

ladies and gentlemen

A phrase typically used to address a crowd or audience consisting of men and women. Ladies and gentlemen, please turn your attention to the main stage for the start of our show! Ladies and gentlemen, can I have your attention please?
See also: and, gentleman, lady

man/woman/gentleman/lady of leisure

Someone who has enough money that they do not need to work for a living, and therefore can spend their time however they please. The group mostly consists of ladies of leisure who use their time, money, and influence to help improve the lives of inner-city children. I tried my hand at a variety of professions, but in the end, the only life that suits me best is that of a man of leisure.
See also: gentleman, lady, leisure, man, of, woman

the little gentleman in the velvet coat

obsolete, literary A humorous name for the mole. The ground was dotted with tiny hills. "What is it that made these?" I asked my uncle. "Why, the little gentleman in the velvet coat," he replied, suppressing a smile.

a gentleman's agreement

or

a gentlemen's agreement

A gentleman's agreement or a gentlemen's agreement is an informal agreement that is not written down but in which people trust one another to do what they have promised. We had no contract; it was done by a gentleman's agreement. I'm hoping we can come to a gentlemen's agreement, Colonel.
See also: agreement

a gentleman's agreement

an arrangement or understanding which is based on the trust of both or all parties, rather than being legally binding.
1991 Charles Anderson Grain: Entrepreneurs There had been a ‘gentleman's agreement’ by the Grain Growers not to enter the markets of Saskatchewan Wheat Pool's predecessor.
See also: agreement

the little gentleman in the velvet coat

the mole. humorous
This expression was a toast used by the Jacobites, supporters of the deposed James II and his descendants in their claim to the British throne. It referred to the belief that the death of King William III resulted from complications following a fall from his horse when it stumbled over a molehill. The phrase is found in various other forms, including the wee gentleman in black velvet .

a ˌgentleman’s aˈgreement

(also a ˌgentlemen’s aˈgreement) an agreement, a contract, etc. in which nothing is written down because both people trust each other not to break it: ‘Why don’t you tell him you don’t want to sell it now?’ ‘I can’t possibly. It was a gentleman’s agreement and I must keep to it.’
See also: agreement

a gentleman and a scholar

A complimentary term for a person, especially one who has done you a favor. Back in the era when courteous behavior and academic achievement were prized far more highly than they are today, acknowledging a kindness, such as holding the door or relinquishing a place on line so that someone else could get a taxi, would be met with a smile, a nod, and the phrase, “You are a scholar and a gentleman.”
See also: and, gentleman, scholar
References in periodicals archive ?
Mark, Steve and Reece, aka The Gentlemen, say: "We are thrilled to bits to be returning to Royston Vasey in celebration of our 20 years at the BBC.
Quote: "I think League of Gentlemen drew on our experiences growing up in northern towns, not that they were as weird and remote as Royston Vasey was.
Since you ask me what I wish, gentlemen, that is my answer.
Mr Todd believed that a good education, and by that he meant the widest possible education, produced civilised gentlemen and ladies.
It is worth remarking, however, that the characteristics attributed by Thackeray to his hero do not constitute a merely objective reflection of the traits of Victorian gentlemen.
Other gentlemen who come to mind are Tom Hanks, Walter Cronkite, Sidney Poitier, Roger Clemens, Chief Justice John G.
GENTLEMEN, MAY I REMIND YOU THAT WE ARE TALKING ABOUT HUMAN LIVES
All True Gentlemen luxury shaving products are also specifically formulated to alleviate inflammation triggered by the shaving process and help calm skin.
The rules of games are to be regarded as mutual agreements, the spirits or letter of which one would no sooner try to evade or break than he would any other agreement between gentlemen.
The League of Gentlemen held their inaugural corporate sporting dinner at Moor Hall Hotel, Sutton Coldfield.
Bound by an editorial convention that should probably change in its wake, Creole Gentlemen capitalizes the term "Creole" as if it were an unshakable ethnic affiliation.
Emily Lowe, who traveled to Norway with her mother in 1857, wrote, "Ladies alone get on in traveling much belier than with gentlemen.
Their latest production, Gentlemen, 2003, inhabits the terminal stages of Carnaby Street, a once-fashionable and distinctively local district that recently gave up the ghost to Starbucks and the Gap.
Though Frye noted the problematic presence of "more ironic comedies" (183) in Shakespeare's corpus, namely All's Well That Ends Well and Measure for Measure, he referred to both The Two Gentlemen of Verona and Much Ado About Nothing as typical comedies, in that their ends "include as many people as possible" (165) in a "redeemed society" (185).