genius

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budding genius

a very bright and promising young person. Harry is a budding genius, but he seems like a fairly normal teenager.
See also: genius

Genius is an infinite capacity for taking pains.

Prov. Genius is the quality of being exceedingly careful about everything you do. If genius is an infinite capacity for taking pains, Marilyn certainly has it. She never overlooks a single detail that needs attention.
See also: genius, pain, taking

Genius is ten percent inspiration and ninety percent perspiration.

Prov. People get brilliant results primarily by working hard, not because they have special inborn powers. Child: Betty always does the best drawings in art class. She must be a genius. Father: If you worked hard, you could do just as well. Remember, genius is ten percent inspiration and ninety percent perspiration.
See also: and, genius, ninety, percent, ten

stroke of genius

an act of genius; a very clever and innovative idea or task. Your idea of painting the rock wall red was a stroke of genius.
See also: genius, of, stroke
References in classic literature ?
They took it into their heads for certain that he commanded the genii, and that he went from place to place like a bird in the twinkling of an eye; and it is a fact that he was everywhere.
A lady with whom I was riding in the forest said to me that the woods always seemed to her to wait, as if the genii who inhabit them suspended their deeds until the wayfarer had passed onward; a thought which poetry has celebrated in the dance of the fairies, which breaks off on the approach of human feet.
The Arabians and Persians had an equal advantage in writing their tales from the genii and fairies, which they believe in as an article of their faith, upon the authority of the Koran itself.
She is more powerful than Suleiman the Wise, who commanded the genii, as you know," said Hollis, gravely.
Although the presiding Genii in such an office as this, exercise a summary and arbitrary power over the liberties, the good name, the character, almost the lives, of Her Majesty's subjects, expecially of the poorer class; and although, within such walls, enough fantastic tricks are daily played to make the angels blind with weeping; they are closed to the public, save through the medium of the daily press.
Then, my precious child, the fun of it is that nobody knows who these Veneerings are, and that they know nobody, and that they have a house out of the Tales of the Genii, and give dinners out of the Arabian Nights.