gather

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Related to gathered: thesaurus, consider, accompanied, acknowledged

a closed mouth gathers no feet

If you say nothing at all, then you can't say anything embarrassing or inappropriate. A play on the idiom "put (one's) foot in (one's) mouth" (to say something stupid). A: "Oh my god, I can't believe I said that. Why are you being so quiet?" B: "Because a closed mouth gathers no feet!" Knowing that I would inevitably say something ridiculous, I kept my mouth shut—a closed mouth gathers no feet, after all.
See also: closed, feet, gather, mouth

be gathered to (one's) fathers

euphemism To die. It's such a shame that Tom has been gathered to his fathers. When is his funeral?
See also: father, gather

gather (one's) wits

To try to calm oneself and think clearly and rationally. Sir, you've just been in an car accident. Take a moment to gather your wits, then please tell us what happened. If your opponent starts badgering you during the debate, remember to gather your wits before responding.
See also: gather, wit

gather dust

To be unused or forgotten, especially for a long period of time. My writing skills have been gathering dust ever since I got this job in the IT department. My grandfather still insists on writing letters by hand, while the laptop I got him gathers dust in the corner of the kitchen.
See also: dust, gather

build a case (against someone)

 and gather a case (against someone)
to put together the evidence needed to make a legal or disciplinary case against someone. The police easily built a case against the drunken driver. As soon as we gather the case against her, we can obtain a warrant to arrest her.
See also: build, case

gather a case

(against someone) Go to build a case (against someone).
See also: case, gather

gather around someone or something

to collect around someone or something. Let's all gather around her and hear her out. Please gather around the table for dinner.
See also: around, gather

gather dust

Fig. [for something] to sit unused for a long time. Most of my talent is just gathering dust because I don't really have an opportunity to perform.
See also: dust, gather

gather someone into something

 and gather someone in
to assemble or bring people into something or some place. The hostess gathered the children into the house just as the storm hit. She gathered in the children. Harry gathered them in before the storm.
See also: gather

gather someone or something around (oneself)

to collect people or things around oneself; to draw someone or something to oneself. He gathered a lot of arty people around himself. She liked to gather exotic plants around herself. Grandpa gathered all the kids around and read them a story.
See also: around, gather

gather someone or something to oneself

to draw someone or something to oneself. The hen gathered her chicks to herself. Harry gathered the poker chips to himself.
See also: gather

gather someone or something together

to assemble people or things together in one place. Gather every one together in the drawing room for a meeting. Please gather together all the suspects so that they can be questioned again. Would you gather all your papers together and put them away?
See also: gather, together

gather something from someone

to collect something from someone. I will gather the papers from Wally, and you go get those that Ted is working on. Would you gather the pictures from everyone? We have to leave now and take them with us.
See also: gather

gather something from someone or something

to learn something from someone or something; to infer something from someone or someone's remarks. (The something is often a clause shifted to another position in the sentence.) I gather from your brother that you do not approve of her. We gathered that from your remarks.
See also: gather

gather something from something

to collect something from something. Kristine gathered the honey from the beehives. I gathered my money from the cashier.
See also: gather

gather something

 in
1. Lit. to collect something and bring it in; to harvest something. We gathered the pumpkins in just before Halloween. We gathered in the pumpkins just in time.
2. . Fig. to fold or bunch cloth together when sewing or fitting clothing. Try gathering it in on each side to make it seem smaller. I will have to gather in this skirt.

gather something up

to collect something; to pick something up. Let's gather our things up and go. Please gather up your things.
See also: gather, up

gather together

to assemble together. We will gather together on the main deck for a meeting. Let's all gather together this evening and sing.
See also: gather, together

Gather ye rosebuds while ye may.

Prov. Enjoy yourself while you can, before you lose the opportunity or before you become too old. (From Robert Herrick's poem, "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time.") Sue: Should I go out on a date with Robbie on Saturday, or should I stay home and study? Ellen: Gather ye rosebuds while ye may. You ought to travel abroad now, while you're young, before you have responsibilities that might keep you from going. Gather ye rosebuds while ye may.
See also: gather, may, ye

rolling stone gathers no moss

Prov. A person who does not settle down is not attached to anything or anyone. (Can be said in admiration or in censure, depending on whether or not the speaker feels it is good to be attached to something or someone.) I worry about Tom. He's never lived in the same place for two years in a row, and he keeps changing jobs. A rolling stone gathers no moss.
See also: gather, moss, roll, stone

rolling stone

A person who moves about a great deal and never settles down, as in Kate's lived in ten cities in as many years-she's a real rolling stone. This expression is a shortening of the proverb a rolling stone gathers no moss, first recorded in 1523, which indicates that one who never settles anywhere will not do well. After some 300 years of this interpretation, in the mid-1800s the value of gathering moss (and staying put) began to be questioned, and in current usage the term is most often used without any particular value judgment.
See also: roll, stone

gather dust

COMMON If something gathers dust, it is not used or dealt with for a very long time. The report has been gathering dust on a shelf. She swam in the pool every morning and used the treadmill that had been gathering dust.
See also: dust, gather

a rolling stone gathers no moss

People say a rolling stone gathers no moss meaning that if a person keeps moving from one place to another, they will not get many friends or possessions. I'm saying that it's not a good idea to get too settled — a rolling stone gathers no moss. Note: You can call a person who does not stay in one place for long a rolling stone. I guess you could call me a rolling stone. My home is out on the waves. Note: Some people use this proverb to say that it is a bad thing to keep moving like this, and it is better to be settled. Other people use this proverb to suggest that it is a good thing to keep moving and changing, and not stay in one place.
See also: gather, moss, roll, stone

collect your wits

or

gather your wits

LITERARY
If you collect your wits or gather your wits, you make an effort to control yourself and become calm again, after a frightening or shocking experience. I took a deep breath and tried to gather my wits. The news was so shocking that I was scarcely able to take it in. Sinking into a leather armchair, I attempted to collect my wits and decide what on earth I was going to tell Lucy.
See also: collect, wit

gather around

or gather round
v.
1. To come to some place and form a group; assemble at: The cowboys gathered round the campfire.
2. To cause some people or things to come to a place; bring some people or things together around a place: We gathered the tour group around the exhibit and began our talk.
See also: around, gather

gather up

v.
1. To bring together or collect something that is distributed or scattered: I gathered up my dress and stepped over the puddle. I gathered the papers up and put them in my briefcase.
2. To come together or be more concentrated in one place: The cloth gathers up at the hem of this dress.
See also: gather, up
References in classic literature ?
While they were thus busy getting their dinner ready, Rumour went round the town, and noised abroad the terrible fate that had befallen the suitors; as soon, therefore, as the people heard of it they gathered from every quarter, groaning and hooting before the house of Ulysses.
Happy sounds were heard in his once lonely home, and bright faces gathered round his knee, and listened tenderly while he strove to tell them all the good that gentleness and love had done for him.
With gentle caresses and most tender words the loving Elves gathered about the child, and, with Rose-Leaf by her side, they led her through the palace, and along green, winding paths, till Eva saw what seemed a wall of flowers rising before her, while the air was filled with the most fragrant odors, and the low, sweet music as of singing blossoms.
Eva looked, and saw from every flower a tiny form come forth to welcome the Elves, who all, save Rose-Leaf, had flown above the wall, and were now scattering dew upon the flowers' bright leaves and talking gayly with the Spirits, who gathered around them, and seemed full of joy that they had come.
There were three binders, and behind them there were boys who gathered the cut corn in armfuls and kept on bringing them to be bound: among them all the owner of the land stood by in silence and was glad.
The girls were crowned with garlands, while the young men had daggers of gold that hung by silver baldrics; sometimes they would dance deftly in a ring with merry twinkling feet, as it were a potter sitting at his work and making trial of his wheel to see whether it will run, and sometimes they would go all in line with one another, and much people was gathered joyously about the green.
A score of brave shots were gathered there, and among them some of the keenest hands at the longbow in Lincoln and Nottinghamshire; and among them Little John stood taller than all the rest.
There was a time when I thought as you do--at least, I was fully persuaded that home and its affections were the only things that made life tolerable: that, if deprived of these, existence would become a burden hard to be endured; but now I have no home--unless you would dignify my two hired rooms at Horton by such a name;--and not twelve months ago I lost the last and dearest of my early friends; and yet, not only I live, but I am not wholly destitute of hope and comfort, even for this life: though I must acknowledge that I can seldom enter even an humble cottage at the close of day, and see its inhabitants peaceably gathered around their cheerful hearth, without a feeling ALMOST of envy at their domestic enjoyment.
Then the Queen took her eldest son out upon a balcony that overlooked the crowd of subjects gathered below, and said to them:
472-480) As for Cycnus, Ceyx buried him and the countless people who lived near the city of the glorious king, in Anthe and the city of the Myrmidons, and famous Iolcus, and Arne, and Helice: and much people were gathered doing honour to Ceyx, the friend of the blessed gods.
In the little German watering-place to which the Shtcherbatskys had betaken themselves, as in all places indeed where people are gathered together, the usual process, as it were, of the crystallization of society went on, assigning to each member of that society a definite and unalterable place.
This Russian girl was not, as Kitty gathered, related to Madame Stahl, nor was she a paid attendant.
However, the green limes that I gathered were not only pleasant to eat, but very wholesome; and I mixed their juice afterwards with water, which made it very wholesome, and very cool and refreshing.
The next day, being the nineteenth, I went back, having made me two small bags to bring home my harvest; but I was surprised, when coming to my heap of grapes, which were so rich and fine when I gathered them, to find them all spread about, trod to pieces, and dragged about, some here, some there, and abundance eaten and devoured.
For an hour or more the chest heaved, the loud, hard breathing continued, getting gradually slower, as the cold dews gathered on the brow.