gate


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crash the gate

To attend an event, such as a concert, sports match, or party, without being invited or paying to get in. That's way too much money to see them in concert, let's just crash the gate and see them on the sly! There's always a few who crash the gate at my party and end up causing trouble.
See also: crash, gate

gatecrasher

One who attends an event, such as a concert, sports match, or party, without being invited or paying to get in. I don't mind gatecrashers coming to my parties, so long as they behave themselves. Due to the popularity of the show—and the limited amount of tickets—extra security was hired to keep any gatecrashers out of the concert.

like a bull at a gate

Very quickly and rashly; hastily, without careful thinking or planning. I only have a few hours before this essay is due, so I'm going at it like a bull at a gate. With only a few seconds left in the match, he started charging at his opponent like a bull at a gate out of desperation.
See also: bull, gate, like

out (of) the (starting) gate

Immediately; at or from the very starting position. Out the gate, the company's latest video game console has proven wildly popular. We're aiming to be the first one out of the gate with mixed-reality technology. The rowdy customer was out cold when the bouncer punched him in the head.
See also: gate, out

the pearly gates

The gates of heaven. The phrase originates from a passage about heaven in the book of Revelation. Sometimes capitalized. When I get to the pearly gates, I want Saint Peter to say, "Now the party can begin!"
See also: gate, pearly

creaking door hangs longest

 and creaking gate hangs longest
Prov. Sickly people often live longer than healthy ones. Jill: I'm worried that my grandmother may not live much longer. She's been sick for so many years. Jane: Well, if it's any comfort, I've heard that a creaking door hangs longest.
See also: creak, door, hang, long

get the gate

Inf. to be sent away; to be rejected. I thought he liked me, but I got the gate. I was afraid I'd get the gate, and I was right.
See also: gate, get

give someone the gate

Sl. to get rid of someone. The chick was a pest, so I gave her the gate. He threatened to give me the gate, so I left.
See also: gate, give

crash the gate

Gain admittance, as to a party or concert, without being invited or without paying. For example, The concert was outdoors, but heavy security prevented anyone from crashing the gate. This term originally applied to persons getting through the gate at sports events without buying tickets. By the 1920s it was extended to being an uninvited guest at other gatherings and had given rise to the noun gatecrasher for one who did so. [Early 1900s]
See also: crash, gate

give someone the air

Also, give someone the brush off or the gate or the old heave-ho . Break off relations with someone, oust someone, snub or jilt someone, especially a lover. For example, John was really upset when Mary gave him the air, or His old friends gave him the brush off, or Mary cried and cried when he gave her the gate, or The company gave him the old heave-ho after only a month. In the first expression, which dates from about 1920, giving air presumably alludes to being blown out. The second, from the first half of the 1900s, alludes to brushing away dust or lint. The third, from about 1900, uses gate in the sense of "an exit." The fourth alludes to the act of heaving a person out, and is sometimes used to mean "to fire someone from a job" (see get the ax). All these are colloquialisms, and all have variations using get, get the air (etc.), meaning "to be snubbed or told to leave," as in After he got the brush off, he didn't know what to do.
See also: air, give

get the gate

AMERICAN
If someone gets the gate, they are sent away or told that they are not wanted. He was replaced for a time by the respected Emanuel Steward, who also eventually got the gate. Note: You can also say that someone is given the gate. Both competitors were given the gate for breaking the rules.
See also: gate, get

the gate

n. a forced exit; sending (someone) away. (see also give someone the gate.) I could see in his eyes that it was the gate for me.
See also: gate

give someone the gate

tv. to get rid of someone. The chick was a pest, so I gave her the gate.
See also: gate, give

get the gate

Slang
To be dismissed or rejected.
See also: gate, get

give (someone) the gate

Slang
1. To discharge from a job.
2. To reject or jilt.
See also: gate, give
References in classic literature ?
She gave me a triumphant glance in passing me, as if she rejoiced that my hands were so coarse and my boots were so thick, and she opened the gate, and stood holding it.
As I passed the flank of the waiting green men they saw my eyes turned upon them, and in an instant, knowing that all secrecy was at an end, those nearest me sprang to their feet in an effort to cut me off before I could reach the gate.
Not even a single guard was visible before the great entrance gate, nor in the gardens beyond, into which he could see, was there sign of the myriad life that pulses within the precincts of the royal estates of the red jeddaks.
The two last places before you come to our gate are the Dog's Cemetery and the chaffinch's nest, but we pretend not to know what the Dog's Cemetery is, as Porthos is always with us.
The bird that found us has flown to the gate to warn the guard.
A few minutes later he returned to the village gate, calling to the natives within.
As Turan had passed through the gateway into the city and taken his unhindered way along the avenue, twenty warriors had entered the city and closed the gate behind them, and then one had taken to the wall and followed along its summit in the rear of Turan, and another had followed him along the avenue, while a third had crossed the street and entered one of the buildings upon the opposite side.
He had managed to coax old Brus, the gardener, into letting him have the key to the little postern gate on the plea that he wished to indulge in a midnight escapade, hinting broadly of a fair lady who was to be the partner of his adventure, and, what was more to the point with Brus, at the same time slipping a couple of golden zecchins into the gardener's palm.
There was no releasing of the ancient padlocks in the time that was left him, so the ape-man called to them to follow him as they were, and, snatching the gun and cartridge belt from the dead sentry, he led the now happy band out through the village gate and into the forest upon the far side of the clearing.
He backed his car close to the side of the hedge, and laying his hand upon the latch of the gate, prepared to swing it open.
Yes, from prison, perhaps, but not from the town; you will see, Van Deken, that the poor fellow will find the gate closed against him which he hoped to find open.
It was only now, with the day drawing to a close and with them approaching the gate of the road to Berkeley, that he had broached the important subject.
The Farmer, beginning to be alarmed for his own safety, opened the gate and released the Lion.
She opened he gate and closed the door after her, leaving the key in the lock.
She and her geese came out of the gate at the foot of the hill as Anne and Gilbert passed.