fury

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Related to furies: Eumenides

Hell hath no fury like a (certain type of person) scorned

No one will have a greater wrath or vengeance than (this type of person) when they have been wronged. A hyperbolic and often humorous play on the phrase "Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned," in which any person, demographic, or profession may be substituted for "woman." The university might think nothing of hiking up the cost of tuition, but we'll show them that Hell hath no fury like a broke college student scorned! The governor, after veering away from his party's core ideologies, is now discovering that Hell hath no fury like politicians scorned.
See also: fury, hath, hell, like, of, scorn, type

like fury

Very quickly and/or intensely. Lucy took off like fury as soon as the race started—all of her training really paid off. We need to drive like fury in order to get there on time!
See also: fury, like

Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.

Prov. There is nothing as unpleasant as a woman who has been offended or whose love has not been returned. When Mary Ann discovered that George was not in love with her, George discovered that hell hath no fury like a woman scorned. Bill: I'm getting tired of going out with Mary; I think I'll tell her we're through. Fred: Be careful. Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned, you know.
See also: fury, hath, hell, like, scorn, woman

hell has no fury like a woman scorned

No anger is worse than that of a jilted woman. For example, Nancy has nothing good to say about Tom-hell has no fury, you know. This term is a shortening of William Congreve's lines, "Heav'n has no rage, like love to hatred turn'd, nor Hell a fury like a woman scorn'd" ( The Mourning Bride, 1697). Similar lines appear in several plays of the same period. Today the proverb is often shortened even more, as in the example.
See also: fury, hell, like, scorn, woman

hell hath no fury like a woman scorned

mainly BRITISH
People say hell hath no fury like a woman scorned to suggest that women often react very angrily to things that upset them. Benjamin's attention shifts from Mrs Robinson to her daughter Elaine and hell hath no fury like an older woman scorned. Note: Journalists often use other words in this expression to make it appropriate to the subject which they are writing about. The golfer, having decided not to attend next week's International Open competition, has discovered that hell hath no fury like a sponsor spurned. Note: This expression is often used to refer to cases where a woman has an unfaithful partner and takes revenge. Note: This comes from William Congreve's `The Mourning Bride' (1697): `Heav'n has no rage, like love to hatred turn'd, Nor Hell a fury, like a woman scorn'd.'
See also: fury, hath, hell, like, scorn, woman
References in classic literature ?
You come here, bearing to Europe the word of a great people, a people whose voice is powerful enough even to still the gathering furies.
He sits to rest on a rock just within a sacred grove of the Furies and is bidden depart by a passing native.
Madame de Belladonna made him a scene about you and fired off in one of her furies.
I had begun my adjuration with solemnity and an awe which almost assured me that the shades of my murdered friends heard and approved my devotion, but the furies possessed me as I concluded, and rage choked my utterance.
He was answered by a general howl, and a few of the boldest of the furies even ventured to approach him, flourishing their knives within a dangerous proximity of his own steady eye-balls.
Friday and I - were two heavenly spirits, or furies, come down to destroy them, and not men with weapons.