full of (oneself)

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Related to full of: full of life, full of beans

full of (oneself)

Having an inflated view of one's importance, to the annoyance of others. Oh, he is so full of himself! Despite what he's told you, he is not the most valuable member of our team, believe me.
See also: full, of

*full of oneself

Fig. conceited; self-important. (*Typically: act ~; be ~.) Mary is very unpopular because she's so full of herself. She doesn't care about other people's feelings. She's too full of herself.
See also: full, of

full of oneself

Conceited, self-centered, as in Ever since she won the prize Mary's been so full of herself that no one wants to talk to her . This expression uses full of in the sense of "engrossed with" or "absorbed with," a usage dating from about 1600.
See also: full, of

full of yourself

very self-satisfied and with an exaggerated sense of self-worth; bumptious.
See also: full, of

ˈfull of yourself

(disapproving) feeling successful and very proud of yourself because of it: He came to see us last week, very full of himself because he had just been promoted.
See also: full, of
References in classic literature ?
Probably somebody had tried to serve the poor old Dom in the same way, when he abandoned the skin full of jewels.
Presently it flared up and showed the whole scene in strong relief, the great mass of white tusks, the boxes of gold, the corpse of the poor Foulata stretched before them, the goat-skin full of treasure, the dim glimmer of the diamonds, and the wild, wan faces of us three white men seated there awaiting death by starvation.
The place was packed as full of smells as a bale is of cotton.
Five years after Jo's wedding, one of these fruitful festivals occurred, a mellow October day, when the air was full of an exhilarating freshness which made the spirits rise and the blood dance healthily in the veins.
The wood, too, was full of a slumbrous murmur that I did not understand.
His horses were full of mettle, and even a little unmanageable.
Hock is full of fancy, and all wines are by their very nature full of reminiscence, the golden tears and red blood of summers that are gone.
Happy he who, like Ulysses, has made an adventurous voyage; and there is no such sea for adventurous voyages as the Mediterranean - the inland sea which the ancients looked upon as so vast and so full of wonders.