fuel


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add fuel to the flame(s)

To do or say something to make an argument, problem, or bad situation worse; to further incense an already angry person or group of people. The debate was going poorly for the senatorial candidate, and his strikingly uncouth comments simply added fuel to the flames. Revelations of the CEO's massive retirement package added fuel to the flame for consumers already furious over the company's dubious financial dealings.
See also: add, fuel

fuel the flame(s)

To do or say something to make an argument, problem, or bad situation worse; to further incense an already angry person or group of people. The debate was going poorly for the senatorial candidate, and his strikingly uncouth comments simply fueled the flames. Revelations of the CEO's massive retirement package fueled the flame for consumers already furious over the company's dubious financial dealings.
See also: fuel

fuel the fire(s)

To do or say something to make an argument, problem, or bad situation worse; to further incense an already angry person or group of people. The debate was going poorly for the senatorial candidate, and his strikingly uncouth comments simply fueled the fires. Revelations of the CEO's massive retirement package fueled the fire for consumers already furious over the company's dubious financial dealings.
See also: fuel

pour fuel on the fire

To do or say something to make an argument, problem, or bad situation worse; to further incense an already angry person or group of people. You know mom's upset with you. Don't pour fuel on the fire by coming home late again. Revelations of the CEO's massive retirement package poured fuel on the fire for consumers already furious over the company's dubious financial dealings.
See also: fire, fuel, on, pour

add fuel to the fire

To do or say something to make an argument, problem, or bad situation worse; to further incense an already angry person or group of people. The debate was going poorly for the senatorial candidate, and his strikingly uncouth comments simply added fuel to the fire. Revelations of the CEO's massive retirement package added fuel to the fire for consumers already furious over the company's dubious financial dealings.
See also: add, fire, fuel

add fuel to the flames

To do or say something to make an argument, problem, or bad situation worse; to further incense an already angry person or group of people. The debate was going poorly for the senatorial candidate, and his strikingly uncouth comments simply added fuel to the flames. Revelations of the CEO's massive retirement package added fuel to the flames for consumers already furious over the company's dubious financial dealings.
See also: add, flame, fuel

add fuel to the fire

 and add fuel to the flame
Fig. to make a problem worse; to say or do something that makes a bad situation worse; to make an angry person get even angrier. (Alludes to causing a flame to grow larger someone or something to move forward when fuel is added.) Shouting at a crying child just adds fuel to the fire.
See also: add, fire, fuel

fuel something (up)

to put fuel into something. I have to fuel this car up before I go any farther. I need to fuel up the car.

fuel up

to fill one's tank with fuel. Let's stop here and fuel up. I need to fuel up at the next little town.
See also: fuel, up

take fuel on

to refuel; to be refueled. (Usually said of a large conveyance, such as a ship or a plane.) We need to land at the next major airport to take fuel on. We will land somewhere to take on fuel.
See also: fuel, on, take

add fuel to the fire

Also, add fuel to the flames. Worsen an already bad situation, as by increasing anger, hostility, or passion, as in Bill was upset, and your making fun of his mishap just added fuel to the fire. This metaphor dates from Roman times-Livy used it in his history of Rome-and it remains in common use. For similar metaphors, see add insult to injury; fan the flames.
See also: add, fire, fuel

add fuel to the fire

or

add fuel to the flames

COMMON If something that someone says or does adds fuel to the fire or adds fuel to the flames, it makes a bad situation worse. You must not try to borrow more money to get yourself out of trouble. This really would be adding fuel to the fire. Her resignation is only likely to add fuel to the flames. Note: These expressions are very variable. For example, you can say that something fuels the fire or fuels the flames, or just that it adds fuel. I'm not going to fuel the fire here: people are perfectly entitled to their own opinion. His comments are bound to add fuel to the debate already taking place within the party about the Greens' public image.
See also: add, fire, fuel

add fuel to the fire (or flames)

(of a person or circumstance) cause a situation or conflict to become more intense, especially by provocative comments.
See also: add, fire, fuel

add ˌfuel to the ˈfire/ˈflames

do or say something which makes a difficult situation worse, or makes somebody even more angry, etc: She was already furious and his apologies and excuses only added fuel to the flames. OPPOSITE: pour oil on troubled water(s)
See also: add, fire, flame, fuel

fuel up

v.
To fill the gas tank of a vehicle with gasoline or other fuel: The family fueled up the car before leaving for the lake. I fueled the truck up so we wouldn't have to stop. It's time to go; let's fuel up.
See also: fuel, up

take on fuel

tv. to drink alcohol to excess. They stopped at the tavern to take on fuel.
See also: fuel, on, take
References in classic literature ?
As we sailed away, after procuring the necessary ingredients of our chemical fuel, the Grubittens lined the shore in silent wonder at the strange sight of our dainty craft dancing over the sparkling waters, and watched us until we were lost to their sight.
The synthetic fuel used aboard the bomber was made by Syntroleum using the Fischer-Tropsch process to make liquefied fuel from natural gas.
On the same day as a flight test of a B-52 bomber running two engines on synthetic fuel, a transit bus used the so-called Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel to carry guests to see the B-52 flight.
When ships shifted to diesel, crews still used the term "bunker" to include liquid fuel tanks.
Automotive fuel containment is said to be a critical factor in vehicle safety.
A study of biofuels released by the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC) last July reports that biomass fuels from such sources could supply as much as 30 percent of the nation's fuel needs by 2050.
With this new innovation, Honda aims to improve fuel economy for 100cc to 125cc engines by 13% compared to the level of 2005.
Clinton may be well into her third or fourth term before the first factories to mass-produce fuel cell vehicles are built.
For instance, a machine that uses 10 gallons of fuel per hour over 10,000 operating hours at a cost of $2 per gallon consumes $200,000 in fuel in its lifetime, or 50 percent of the machine's purchase price in the case of a $400,000 scrap handler.
In a diesel system, fuel transfer pumps, injection pumps and fuel injectors have parts that rely upon lubrication.
Personally, I'm looking at 2007 for equipment manufacturers to come out with a fuel-cell version, and 2008 for the mining industry to start switching over to fuel cells.
In truth, Henry Ford was the first vocal proponent of an 'alternative' fuel: ethanol, lie preferred grain-produced ethanol fuel for his cars, not because the engines ran better (they do), and not because ethanol is nearly pollution-free (it offers spectacular reductions in emissions), but because he believed in the economic benefits of supporting the larger community by having farmers make ethanol fuel.
Late in the first quarter of this year, both computer giants demonstrated working prototypes of micro fuel cells which they will commercialize next year, beginning with corporate clients.
As Hoffman writes in his book, Tomorrow's Energy: Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and the Prospects for a Cleaner Planet (MIT Press), hydrogen can "propel airplanes, cars, trains and ships, run plants, and heat homes, offices, hospitals and schools.
Recently, Garth confided, he did some rough calculations on fuel costs.