freeze

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freeze

1. n. the act of ignoring someone; the cold shoulder. Everybody seems to be giving me the freeze.
2. tv. to ignore someone; to give someone the cold shoulder. Don’t freeze me, gang! I use a mouth wash!
3. in. to hold perfectly still. (Also a command given by a police officer that implies there is a gun pointed at a suspect.) The fuzz shouted, “Freeze, or you’re dead meat!”
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References in classic literature ?
The Tununirmiut returned from the yearly salmon-fishing, and made their houses on the early ice to the north of Bylot's Island, ready to go after the seal as soon as the sea froze.
He was the first of some twenty or thirty seal that landed on the island in the course of the day, and till the sea froze hard there were hundreds of keen black heads rejoicing in the shallow free water and floating about with the floating ice.
Two white men an' a Swede froze to death that night, an' there was a dozen busted their lungs.
And they went through, winning half the length of the lake by nightfall and pulling on through all the night hours as the wind went down, falling asleep at the oars and being rapped awake by Liverpool, toiling on through an age-long nightmare while the stars came out and the surface of the lake turned to the unruffledness of a sheet of paper and froze skin-ice that tinkled like broken glass as their oar-blades shattered it.
The barges were to be towed by the last little steamboat in Dawson, and the hope was that Fort Yukon, where lay the stranded steamboats, would be gained before the river froze.
Running in cake-ice all the way, and several times escaping jams in the Yukon Flats, the barges made their hundreds of miles of progress farther into the north and froze up cheek by jowl with the grub-fleet.
In 1845 Walden froze entirely over for the first time on the night of the 22d of December, Flint's and other shallower ponds and the river having been frozen ten days or more; in '46, the 16th; in '49, about the 31st; and in '50, about the 27th of December; in '52, the 5th of January; in '53, the 31st of December.
At Sieu Hoang's Exotic Garden Nursery in Reseda, the plants in his plastic-encased greenhouse, where the temperature hovered in the low 40s, almost all survived, while those outdoors with no cover froze.