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fork out the dough

To pay, generally unwillingly, a certain amount of money. If you want the most cutting edge technology, you'd better be prepared to fork out the dough for it. Listen, fork out the dough or you'll never see your husband again!
See also: dough, fork, out

fork over the dough

To pay, generally unwillingly, a certain amount of money. If you want the most cutting edge technology, you'd better be prepared to fork over the dough for it. Listen, fork over the dough or you'll never see your husband again!
See also: dough, fork

stick a fork in (me/it/something)

A phrase used to indicate that one or something is finished, complete, or no longer able to continue. Alludes to the practice of testing how thoroughly a piece of meat is cooked by piercing it with a fork. Barbara: "Johnny, would you like any more of this cake?" Johnny: "No thank you, Barb. You can stick a fork in me, I'm done!" I'd say we just need one more week on the project, and then you'll be able to stick a fork in it!
See also: fork, stick

fork the fingers

To give a rude gesture with one's hand. This phrase is rarely heard today. I told you, it was an honest mistake, so don't fork the fingers at me!
See also: finger, fork

play a good knife and fork

To eat vigorously. My, you're playing a good knife and fork tonight—you must be hungry!
See also: and, fork, good, knife, play

Fingers were made before forks.

Prov. It is all right to eat with one's fingers because people had to eat somehow before there were forks. (Used to justify eating something with your fingers.) Mother: Put that chicken wing back on your plate and eat it properly, with a knife and fork. Child: But Mom, fingers were made before forks. I don't see why it's considered bad manners to eat with your fingers. Fingers were made before forks.
See also: before, Finger, fork, made

fork some money out (for something)

Fig. to pay (perhaps unwillingly) for something. (Often mention is made of the amount of money. See the examples.) Do you think I'm going to fork twenty dollars out for that book? Forking out lots of money for taxes is part of life.
See also: fork, money, out

fork something out

 (to someone)
1. Inf. Lit. to serve food to someone, using a fork. He forked out the chicken to everyone. He brought up a big dish of fried chicken and forked it out.
2. Fig. to give out something to someone. We forked the coupons out to everyone who asked for them. We forked out the coupons.
See also: fork, out

fork something over (to someone)

Inf. to give something to someone. (Usually refers to money.) Come on! Fork the money over to me! Fork over the cash you owe me!
See also: fork

fork over something

also fork something over
1. to pay money We headed into the theme park after forking over $45 each. Related vocabulary: cough up something
2. to give something to someone unwillingly The cops knew he had a knife, and they made him fork it over.
See also: fork

fork over

Also, fork out or up . Hand over, pay up. For example, It's time you forked over what you owe, or He forked out a hundred for that meal, or Fork up or we'll sue. [Slang; early 1800s]
See also: fork

fork out

v.
1. To distribute or supply something, especially money: The government forks out millions of dollars to maintain the royal palace. The town finally forked the cash out for a new high school.
2. To split or diverge; fork: The river forks out in numerous places in the delta.
See also: fork, out

fork over

or fork up
v.
To give or transfer something, especially in a reluctant, unenthusiastic, or automatic way: I thought the rug was overpriced, but I forked the cash over. We forked over our admission tickets to the usher and walked into the theater.
See also: fork

fork something over

tv. to hand something over (to someone). Okay, fork over the dough and be quick about it!
See also: fork

Fork you!

exclam. Fuck you! (A partial disguise. Rude and derogatory.) Fork you, you stupid twit!
See also: fork
References in classic literature ?
And pound he did, on the nose with the butt of the whip, and jab he did, with the iron fork to the ribs.
At the same moment, an attendant, through the bars behind, drove an iron fork into his ribs to force him away from the bars and toward the chair.
His helpless body guided thus by the tail, his chest jabbed by the iron fork in Mulcachy's hands, the rope was suddenly lowered, and Ben Bolt, with swimming brain, found himself seated in the chair.
For the day came when Mulcachy rapped the chair with his whip-butt, when the attendant through the bars jabbed the iron fork into Ben Bolt's ribs, and when Ben Bolt, anything but royal, slinking like a beaten alley-cat, in pitiable terror, crawled over to the chair and sat down in it like a man.
But I'd give a good many silver forks to know exactly how you fell into this affair, and how you got the stuff out of him.
Colonel," said Father Brown, "I tell you that this archangel of impudence who stole your forks walked up and down this passage twenty times in the blaze of all the lamps, in the glare of all the eyes.
The dinner's going again in spanking style, and old Audley has got to make a speech in honour of the forks being saved.
The Duke, however stimulated, had the instincts of an aristocrat, and desired rather to stare at the house than to spy on it; but Flambeau, who had the instincts of a burglar (and a detective), had already swung himself from the wall into the fork of a straggling tree from which he could crawl quite close to the only illuminated window in the back of the high dark house.
Horace Holmcroft dropped his fork, rested his elbows on the table, and answered:
up'd' (this was the cook's exact information) with the bottle, knife, fork, and decanter (the decanter now coolly flying at everybody's head, without the least introduction), and thrown them all at Mr.
Sometimes, after every two or three mouthfuls, he laid down his knife and fork, and stared at his son with all his might--particularly at his maimed side; then, he looked slowly round the table until he caught some person's eye, when he shook his head with great solemnity, patted his shoulder, winked, or as one may say--for winking was a very slow process with him--went to sleep with one eye for a minute or two; and so, with another solemn shaking of his head, took up his knife and fork again, and went on eating.
I'm at low-water-mark myself--only one bob and a magpie; but, as far as it goes, I'll fork out and stump.
He had raised his fork to his lips, and was on the very point of opening his mouth for the reception of a piece of beef, when the hum of many voices suddenly arose in the kitchen.
Tupman was observed to lay down his knife and fork, and to turn very pale.
Is fork, sir, fork,' replied Mr Swiveller slapping his picket.